TABLE OF CONTENTS 2005 issue 2

BY ROBERT E. HUNTER

Another step towards increasing Canada’s influence in the global security world, is the recent selection of General Ray Henault, Canada’s former Chief of the Defence Staff, as the next Chairman of NATO’s Military Committee.

Interview with Dan Ross, ADM(Mat)
BY JOHN LEECH

Addressing the newest challenges and priorities of information management, Dan Ross helps to maximize IM capabilities in a diverse job with a broad scope and critical customers.

BY LEWIS MacKENZIE

Numerous times during the past four years, Canadians were promised a Defence White Paper which would follow and respond to an updated Foreign Policy review.

BY TERRY LISTON

In Defence Minister Bill Graham’s impend­ing defence review, he should consider two factors: the rapidly evolving technology; and the significant changes in the threat.

BY DON McLEOD

No sovereign nation with the size and location of Canada can be without a ­balanced military. “Boots on the ground” is the current buzz phrase. Do we need more and better equipped soldiers?

BY ANGUS BROWN

Canada’s Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) has now returned, and its personnel have dispersed to their respective units. Another chapter in CF humanitarian operations has ended and statistics are flowing from the NDHQ Public Affairs desks to anyone who wants to listen to the usefulness and success of the DART deployment.

BY SUNIL RAM

The buzzword across NATO and the US military is “Transformation.” Under the leadership of General Rick Hillier the Canadian Forces (CF) is in the process of prosecuting the transformation vision.

BY ALAN WILLIAMS

On the world scene, emerging threats to security, coupled with the rapid pace of technological change, meant our procure­ment decisions were becoming more critical than ever. Increasingly, our military success depended on deployment speed, interoperability with allies, and leading edge equipment.

BY RON KANE

The sustainability of defence sector firms is now just as much a condition of their economic importance as is their strategic importance to national security and defence.

BY RALPH FISHER

With the shake up in leadership by Defence Minister, Bill Graham, and apparent mandate by the Chief of the Defence Staff, General Rick Hillier, to revitalize culture and structure, there is a growing warmth of expectation that we are entering a new age of naval forces for ­projection of power and humanity from the sea.

BY GARY H. RICE

The vision of the future set out here is one that would see the adoption of a first ever made-in-Canada defence strategy that has its roots in doctrine that is as as old as Canada itself.

BY KENNETH P. HANSEN

Daily revelations in the news seem to indicate that the impending Defence Review will result in the creation of a joint expeditionary capability. Such a fundamental shift in rationale should provoke changes in the force structure of the Canadian Navy.

BY STAN JACOBSON

Training supports the ­”ultimate” activity, which is cost-effective, timely and accurate on-the-job performance. Individuals in the training pipeline (instructors, students, or support staff), are not performing operational tasks.

BY SCOTT FLUKINGER, BY CHRIS BOUQUET

The USA will spend an estimated US $7.6 billion on biodefense measures in 2005, and they want Canadian companies to join the search for solutions.

BY ROBERT DAY

There has arisen a problem surrounding the understanding and use of the terms used to describe the governance of defence issues and problems. Growing dependence on civilian business management publications and incorrect use of these terms by government managers and civilian ­consultants has come to create problems for the government’s lexicon.

BY PETER PIGOTT

Airbus Military’s A400M