TABLE OF CONTENTS 2006 issue 1

BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Can transparency, efficiency and fairness co-exist in defence procurement?

BY PAUL MANSON, BY HOWARD MARSH

The acquisition of equipment and related services for the Canadian Forces has become the hottest subject in town, for a simple reason: the situation, long deteriorating, has now reached the critical stage.

BY JAMES COX

Many in the defence industry community have taken DND to task over the department’s intention to fast-track new  tactical airlift for the Canadian Forces.

BY ALAN WILLIAMS

Defence procurement is critical to defence capability.

BY TIM PAGE

Best Value for Canada.

The need for authority and accountability
BY SIR JACK DEVERELL

Expeditionary warfare against an asymmetric enemy makes profound demands on political and military structures, and brings with it high levels of risk, not least because the war is more likely to be one of choice than of necessity...

BY JOHN LEECH

Selection and Maintenance of the Aim.

BY JOE VARNER

The politicization of Canada’s Defence procurement process continued with the recent announcement of a $4.6 billion plan for 16 new aircraft to replace Canada’s fleet of old C-130 Hercules tactical transports just on the eve of the federal election. 

What is it?

Canada’s armed forces are transforming. As outlined in the 2005 Defence Policy Statement, the transformation centres on encouraging innovation, promoting efficiency, and above all, on instigating a “fundamental change in military culture.” 

BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Over the years, various procedures have been followed when purchasing military ­equipment, from long and costly procedures to replace the Sea King helicopters, to the purchase of 16 tactical aircraft at a cost of close to $5 billion.

BY BERNARD COURTOIS

We are often the first to hear about challenges presented by procurement and, indeed, it is our role to speak on behalf of our members so that issues get solved.

SME Confidential Report

This report is a compilation of conversations and communications with a Canadian consulting company.

BY JOHN J.D. READ

Government procurement is a complex process, requiring careful planning, constant oversight, and highly sophisticated professional skills.