CATEGORIES

Cutting edge aerospace and marine solutions
(2017,
issue 5)

As a result of Canada's Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships program requirements, a team of engineers, scientists and technicians from Toronto-based Nanowave Technologies are working on innovative solutions for some of the world’s top defence and aerospace platforms and companies.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A recent RCAF announcement may impact defence policy, defence procurement, SAR mission effectiveness. Who will answer the SAR community?

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Adapting to anti-submarine warfare (ASW) requires mastering new technologies that provide capabilities to leverage reachback systems, robust networks, and distributed strike options.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Danish government has released a new defence agreement covering the next six years of defense expenditure and planning. It also defines the top two threats to focus on in terms of priorities and spending.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

Given the public response each time the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) calls for astronaut applications, it is clear that thousands of us feel we possess the necessary qualifications to get into space, however, only a few make it through the selection process.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

The space industry’s role in the Canadian economy is significant, including earth observation, communications, robotics, and pure and applied research. 

(2017,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The rebuilding of Russia’s Northern fleet and its defense bastion built around the Kola Peninsula creates a direct challenge to Norway, and is of strategic interest to all of the Arctic Council States.

From the Tower
(2017,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
Is the air force tripping up on policy changes?

Does Canada face unmanageable simultaneous commitments to NORAD and NATO? The House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence (SCND) recently went In Camera to start drafting its long-awaited report on “Canada and the Defence of North America”, an issue the Members of Parliament have been studying for the better part of a year. 

FWSAR
(2017,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The RCAF’s new Fixed-Wing Search and Rescue aircraft will be a “game-changer.” 

(2017,
issue 1)
BY JAMES FRYER
Stroke of genius or sorry drama?

Defence capability gaps aren’t an issue in our country. So why should the federal government announce one now?

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Airbus Defence and Space is Europe’s number 1 defence and space company, the second largest space business worldwide and a top ten global defence enterprise. It is a division of Airbus, which in 2016 generated revenues of €67b and employs 134,000 people, including 2,000 Canadians.

Airbus Defence and Space has four business lines.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)


 
Rockwell Collins is a pioneer in the development and deployment of innovative aviation and high-integrity solutions for both commercial and government applications. Our expertise in flight deck avionics, cabin electronics, mission communications, simulation and training, and information management is delivered by a global workforce, and a service and support network that crosses more than 150 countries.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

“We don’t know what’s going to change the world next,” says Lockheed Martin Canada Chief Executive, Charles Bouchard, “but Lockheed Martin and its partners are probably already working on it.”

From naval innovation to renewable energy and autonomous systems to cyber security, Lockheed Martin Canada is building upon its 78-year tradition as Canada’s trusted defence partner with an eye to the future.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Our President also has small hands, but he does not build walls or grab cats.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Esterline Avionics Systems has achieved an international reputation for innovation and excellence in the design and manufacture of advanced displays and CMC Electronics brand avionics for the aviation markets. CMC Electronics is a wholly owned subsidiary of Esterline Corporation, a specialized aerospace and defense company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington, with over 13,000 employees worldwide.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

UTC serves customers in the commercial aerospace, defense and building industries and ranks among the world's most respected and innovative companies. We are a company founded by people who invented technologies, turned them into businesses and, through innovation, built entire industries.

(2017,

President Trump is proposing a $54 Billion surge in U.S. military spending for new ships and aircraft (including fighters) in his first federal budget – while slashing big chunks from domestic programs and foreign aid to make the government "do more with less."

Russia to expand military aviation fleet by 2020
(2016,
issue 6)

Russia is in the process of expanding and modernizing its national military aviation fleet (manned and unmanned) by 2020. 

(2016,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Obligations to shareholders and the ­markets are all very nice and, frankly, understandable. But what about ­obligations to taxpayers everywhere who ultimately foot the bills?

Fixed-Wing Search and Rescue Program
(2016,
issue 4)

If the C-27J Spartan is chosen to become the nation’s next fixed-wing search-and-rescue (FWSAR) aircraft, the mission of DRS Technologies Canada will be to help make that challenge more manageable.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

The Russian Ministry of Defence plans to significantly accelerate R&D activities.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

WWII Spitfire and Hurricane pilot epitomizes the dedication and humility of wartime service.

(2016,
issue 2)

Brazil’s military is currently struggling to sort out what they can continue to fund, what can be delayed, and what must simply be abandoned.

The United Kingdom’s Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

An assessment of Britain's National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 and how it impacts defence recapitalization.

2016 Defence White Paper
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

A look at key drivers to Australia's Security environment and the pace of military modernization.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD CAYOUETTE
The Need for a Statement of Requirements

What are our future needs? Have new technologies and threats been considered? Read on for a personal commentary on the replacement program.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

These last few years have seen a flurry of activity. The bids have now been submitted – finally setting the stage for first delivery of new aircraft. FrontLine looks at the process and the contenders.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

A global leader in the delivery of training for the defence and security, civil aviation and healthcare markets.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

Providing diverse services to aerospace, defence customers: health care, IT services, engineering, and complex pre-deployment training exercises.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

This leading global security company provides innovative systems, products and solutions in autonomous systems, cyber, C4ISR, logistics and modernization to government and commercial customers worldwide.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

A rugged and maneuverable multi-mission aircraft, the C-27J Spartan offers some of the most up-to-date features available in aviation today.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

Designs, manufactures and services engineered textiles and survival solutions for all military environments.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

UTC companies provide high-technology systems and services for the fast-growing aerospace and building industries.

A look at the 5th Gen-enabled Air Combat Force
(2015,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

How much more hybrid can you get than the current situation over Syria? Airpower needs to seamlessly operate in all airspace – uncontested, contestable and contested.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A strategy built around shaping innovative ways to integrate assets in support of air and joint operations.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY JEAN-MARC TANGUY

After years of research and investment, robotic technology deserves a greatly expanded role in many areas.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The case of the Airbus A400M. The tragic crash of an A400M during test flight, reminds us of how risky the introduction of new systems can be. An April tour of the Airbus facilities in Spain helps put risk and the drive to perfect into perspective.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

Airbus Helicopters Canada is the helicopter manufacturing division of Airbus Group that designs, builds and supports state of the art Helicopters in Canada.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

The Aerospace and Defence Industry Association of Newfoundland and Labrador facilitates the development of business opportunities in the Aerospace, Defence and Security sector and acts as a common forum for all Newfoundland and Labrador aerospace and defence related companies, agencies and other interested stakeholders.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

Prototype Equipment Design is a Canadian company providing precision design and manufacturing for the global future.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

The Alenia C-27J Spartan is a medium-sized military transport aircraft developed and manufactured by Alenia Aermacchi.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

Pratt & Whitney: A global leader in aircraft propulsion. UTC Aerospace Systems: Suppliers of advance aerospace and defense products. Sikorsky: Industry leader in flight solutions for commercial and military markets around the world.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Land wars of the past decade have led to a significant redirection of military forces, particularly in the United States. Will this new focus help thwart and destroy ISIS? Can supporting the Kurdish military win against the “Islamic State” jihadists?

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

A decade of painfully public, thoroughly documented delays and renegotiations has taken the procurement beyond an embarrassment to a political liability.

(2013,
issue 6)

Boeing updates its CF-18 legacy Hornet. The Super Hornet is set to challenge for Canada's new fighter jet requirement.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

New cargo aircraft offer an intriguing mix of capacity, capability and range.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Troubling questions remain about quality control in the F-35 supply chain.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The Project Manager (2000-2005) recalls the original SOR process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY BETHAN NODWELL

The CP-140 Aurora is arguably the most effective strategic C4ISR platform available.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Airpower is ­central to 21st century security; but not by supporting aircraft with limited aviation tanking assets.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The procurement of FWSAR aircraft has waxed and waned for over a decade.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY LLOYD CAMPBELL

The CP-140 Aurora is arguably the most effective strategic C4ISR platform available.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

The program is steadily progressing. A look at the latest numbers. Are Canadian ­companies benefitting?

(2013,
issue 1)
BY JAMES FRYER

There are no bargains in a hostile sky. Alternative fighter jets could make Joint Strike Fighter look like a good deal.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

From troubled program to transformation reality, the Osprey has emerged to offer astoundingly flexible capabilities. Are new capabilities and proven frontline performance worth the price?

(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT WILSEY

New frontline fighters have revolutionized basic & advanced military flying training. With flight time so expensive, the call goes out for a new generation of Trainers.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Are you relieved that we are turning the clocks back to the pre-sole-sourcing days of the CF-18 replacement?

(2009,
issue 6)

DCNS; WiDS; Lockheed Martin.

LGen Angus Watt
(2007,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Recruit, train, and equip – these three words sum up the responsibilities of the Chief of the Air Staff – and always with an eye to the future. Long term plans focus on investing in capability, something that has been gradually diminished in recent decades. 

(2007,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT WILSEY

Until a few years ago, major air forces worldwide trained their jet pilots on basic and advanced training aircraft equipped with analogue cockpits. As a result, a widening technology gap has developed between Advanced Jet Training (AJT) aircraft of the 1970's (such as BAE Hawk TMk1, Aero L39 Albatross and Dassault Alphajet) and modern front-line combat aircraft.

Future Forces
(2006,
issue 2)

The proliferation of the Unmanned Vehicle System is evidence of a new path for defence and security. What is the future for these systems and how will technological advances develop for either homeland security or defence missions?…

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The politicization of Canada’s Defence procurement process continued with the recent announcement of a $4.6 billion plan for 16 new aircraft to replace Canada’s fleet of old C-130 Hercules tactical transports just on the eve of the federal election. 

(2006,
issue 1)
What is it?

Canada’s armed forces are transforming. As outlined in the 2005 Defence Policy Statement, the transformation centres on encouraging innovation, promoting efficiency, and above all, on instigating a “fundamental change in military culture.” 

(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Over the years, various procedures have been followed when purchasing military ­equipment, from long and costly procedures to replace the Sea King helicopters, to the purchase of 16 tactical aircraft at a cost of close to $5 billion.

(2005,
issue 6)

Last month, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) led international surveillance-oriented trials off the coast of Nova Scotia. The 3-week long Maritime Sensor Integration Experiment (MARSIE) trial will directly contribute to Canada’s ability to conduct high-tech surveillance and secure its coastal approaches against potential threats and illegal activities.

(2005,
issue 6)

With its letters and logo emblazoned on the badges of more than 4,300 airport screening officers, most Canadians boarding a flight in this country should recognize the name CATSA (Canadian Air Transport Security Authority). Few, however, are fully aware of its critical role in the global security system.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Our neglect in developing a national SAR strategy has left the Canadian North dangerously vulnerable to more fatal accidents, and we may be called to task.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The Canadian Forces’ efforts have turned to replacing the aging and increasingly unavailable fleets of CC-130 Hercules and CC-115 Buffalos. What has happened to the ''fast-tracked'' FWSAR requirement?

(2005,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Chief Test Pilot, Gianluca Evangelisti, and Test Pilot, Agostino Frediani, have been with the C-27J Spartan program from the start. Both talked to FrontLine’s Peter Pigott at the Alenia Caselle facility about the aircraft.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS WATTIE

C-295 to become the Air Force’s new fixed-wing search and rescue aircraft.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY
The Next Wave?

Canada has not possessed any capability for Combat Search and Rescue since the end of the Second World War when Canadian squadrons participated in the rescue of many downed allied airmen, however, this may have to change – and very soon. 

(2005,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Its unique flying characteristics make the helicopter ideally suited to search and rescue missions worldwide.

(2005,
issue 5)
Op HUDSON SENTINEL

Effectively carrying out Search and Rescue operations is a significant asset that the Canadian Forces work diligently to maintain.

(2005,
issue 5)

Canada’s area of responsibility for SAR covers over 15.5 million square kilometres, of which over 60% is above the tree line. Given those facts, training for arctic rescue is critical to ensure an appropriate response to distresses in that region. Arctic SAREX is a testament to the Canadian Forces’ dedication that others may live.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

There is only one way to ensure that Canadian sovereignty is protected, and that is through the ability of the nation to exercise joint military power in concert with a strong foreign policy and an able diplomatic service.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY GARY H. RICE

Because Canadians no longer live in a “fire-proof house” perhaps now might be the right occasion to pay heed to the words of Liddell Hart: “A self contained and sea-based amphibious force is the best kind of fire extinguisher because of its flexibility, reliability, logistics simplicity and relative economy.”

(2005,
issue 3)
BY DON McLEOD

Canada’s new Defence Policy is a bold and innovative approach to peace and security in the 21st century.

LGen Steve Lucas
(2005,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada’s newest Chief of the Air Staff explains how the transformed Air Force will reposition itself to effectively respond to threats faced in today’s world.

BGen Dwayne Lucas
(2005,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The revolutionary new way of contracting for the Air Force, Optimized Weapons System Support Management, puts more responsibility on industry, but they also gain in the global market by becoming “best of breed.”

The European Option:
(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is a growing demand for military transport aircraft. The world’s Air Forces will take delivery of 922 new transports valued at US$53 billion. FrontLine reviews three aircraft that could handle the CF requirements: Lockheed C-130J, Boeing C-17, and the Airbus A400M.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The latest model is the C-130J, and it represents a nearly complete reinvention of the Hercules.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is a growing demand for military transport aircraft. The world's Air Forces will take delivery of 922 new transports valued at US$53 billion. FrontLine reviews three aircrafts that could handle the CF requirements: Lockheed C-130J, Boeing C-17, and the Airbus A400M.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY RICK THOMPSON

Modeling and Simulation (M&S) is a key ­component of the wide-ranging ­program of transformation (including advanced mission training) in Canada’s Air Force today. Numerous M&S projects, sponsored by the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS), are intended to increase air power capabilities affordably and effectively.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY DON McLEOD

No sovereign nation with the size and location of Canada can be without a ­balanced military. “Boots on the ground” is the current buzz phrase. Do we need more and better equipped soldiers?

(2005,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

On the world scene, emerging threats to security, coupled with the rapid pace of technological change, meant our procure­ment decisions were becoming more critical than ever. Increasingly, our military success depended on deployment speed, interoperability with allies, and leading edge equipment.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Airbus Military’s A400M

LGen Rick Hillier
(2005,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Combining previous experience in volatile countries with his service in Afghanistan as Commander of the multinational International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in 2004, LGen Rick Hillier is well positioned to transfer lessons learned fighting rebel forces to the new Army transformation and regeneration process.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JEAN JACQUES BLAIS

It's unfortunate that the subject of military spending is almost always precipitated by a tragic incident within our armed forces or their inability to respond when needed. This latest tragedy should be a wake up call that we need to seriously examine how we equip our military to represent our nation to the world.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JOHN LEECH

FrontLine had the opportunity to chat with the Commandant about the Atlantic Littoral ISR Experiment (ALIX), the largest major undertaking in the ongoing CFEC program.

(2004,
issue 5)

As the exclusive flight test agency of the Canadian Forces, the AETE conducts a wide variety of flight and ground testing involving every aircraft and helicopter type in the Canadian inventory. 

(2004,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

With development costs for modern fighters rising, commonality and outsourcing to multiple allies has become the norm.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY ANIL R. PUSTAM

Operation Iraqi Freedom, while not a model for future conflict, still ­provides pointers to how far the US has progressed along the path to fielding capabilities that are increasingly important in the emerging American way of war.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY PAUL C. WHITEHEAD

Effectiveness, Cost & Crime Prevention.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Take a look back.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY JOHN LEECH

Unmanned systems are becoming apart of our lives now.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT
The C-27J SPARTAN

Lockheed Martin and Alenia conceived an updated variant of the G222.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY DAVE BROWN

How would you summarize the Typhoon as an aircraft? 

(2004,
issue 2)

Multinational flying packages which are becoming common in ­military operations today. The NFTC offers participating air forces a three-phase training programme for their future fighter pilots using state-of-art software and equipment.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The current state of Canada's air mobility fleet is an area of concern. The renewal of our air-to-air refuelling role will greatly enhance the contribution that our air mobility and fighter forces can make in the implementation of the Government’s foreign and domestic policy goals.

FrontLine Notebook
(2004,
issue 1)

General Atomics Aero­nautical Systems, Inc., was awarded a Canadian Forces contract to deploy its ALTAIR unmanned aircraft, a Predator B variant, in support of the Atlantic Littoral Intelligence, Surveillance, Recon­naissance Experiment (ALIX).

(2004,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is widespread consensus that NATO must change, that it must modernize and transform into a rapidly deployable force able to operate anywhere at a moment’s notice.

Unmanned Vehicles Take Off – Again
(2004,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

Thanks to the timely work of a new association called UVS Canada and their first major conference, "Momentum 2003," held recently in Ottawa, there is now a focus and a platform for the kind of collaboration necessary to start exploring this potential.