CATEGORIES

(2017,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A recent RCAF announcement may impact defence policy, defence procurement, SAR mission effectiveness. Who will answer the SAR community?

(2017,
issue 5)

Airbus Helicopters, BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA, and Ultra Electronics

(2017,
issue 3)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
A bold call for recapitalization & modernization

A bold call for expediting platform replacement and modernization.

FWSAR
(2017,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The RCAF’s new Fixed-Wing Search and Rescue aircraft will be a “game-changer.” 

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Airbus Defence and Space is Europe’s number 1 defence and space company, the second largest space business worldwide and a top ten global defence enterprise. It is a division of Airbus, which in 2016 generated revenues of €67b and employs 134,000 people, including 2,000 Canadians.

Airbus Defence and Space has four business lines.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Tulmar designs, manufactures and services engineered textiles and survival solutions. We deliver products and services that protect people – in the air, on the ground and in the water.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Established in 1955, Rosborough Boats specializes in semi-custom ­vessel solutions, working with governments and private industry users to maximize the usability and cross mission success often required in the ­maritime environment.

Maritime Tactical Operations Group
(2016,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

A new tactical requirement to patrol and protect maritime trade routes has created a resurgence of vessel boardings and searches.

Fixed-Wing Search and Rescue Program
(2016,
issue 4)

If the C-27J Spartan is chosen to become the nation’s next fixed-wing search-and-rescue (FWSAR) aircraft, the mission of DRS Technologies Canada will be to help make that challenge more manageable.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD
From Stable to Scramble

With growing strategic importance of the region, the five coastal states bordering the Arctic Ocean are watching threats.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

These last few years have seen a flurry of activity. The bids have now been submitted – finally setting the stage for first delivery of new aircraft. FrontLine looks at the process and the contenders.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

A rugged and maneuverable multi-mission aircraft, the C-27J Spartan offers some of the most up-to-date features available in aviation today.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

Is propping up old platforms for a two-year gap, rather than speeding up procurement of newer alternatives, the best use of scarce resources?

(2015,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A recurring theme in many FrontLine articles over the last decade, the need for a clarification of vital national interests on which to articulate clear policy reverberates strongly in this edition.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

BRP is a global leader in the design, development, manufacturing, distribution and marketing of powersports vehicles and propulsion systems.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

The MASS15 conference will bring together and showcase organizations that play a key role in the execution of Maritime & Arctic Security & Safety.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

The Alenia C-27J Spartan is a medium-sized military transport aircraft developed and manufactured by Alenia Aermacchi.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Are criticisms of the FWSAR reset fair? Were years of work ''lost'' or somewhat irrelevant?

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Multiculturalism in the CF provides a clear advantage to the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) deployed to help the Philippines recover from Typhoon Haiyan.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Deliberations on optional budget reductions must examine some sacred cows that have escaped scrutiny, largely because of ignorance, apathy or cowardice. Consider these gutsy ideas when cutting the defence budget.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Can a single-mission aircraft meet multiple government goals in the Far North?

(2013,
issue 5)
BY JANE KOKAN

Inuit communities are ready, willing and able to contribute in the high North.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

As frustration levels rise among those involved in defence procurement, FrontLine responds by publishing additional rounds of constructive commentaries in this and coming editions.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A FWSAR fly-off would be a great idea if it tested either the search or the rescue capabilities (and preferably both). But it tests only speed and range?

(2013,
issue 3)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The Project Manager (2000-2005) recalls the original SOR process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The procurement of FWSAR aircraft has waxed and waned for over a decade.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

From troubled program to transformation reality, the Osprey has emerged to offer astoundingly flexible capabilities. Are new capabilities and proven frontline performance worth the price?

(2012,
issue 5)

Airbus Military, Boeing, CAE, DCNS, DRS Technologies, Lockheed Martin, MDA, Northrop Grumman, Pelican Products, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Rheinmetall, Textron, Viking Air.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE, BY RICHARD BRAY

The Royal Canadian Air Force’s hopes of having new FWSAR aircraft in service by 2015 received a boost, of sorts when PWGSC released an LOI to potential suppliers. But new options are appearing on the horizon.

(2012,
issue 2)

Patrolling the Irish Coast

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence Procurement, SAR and Communication Control.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Canada needs new search and rescue aircraft.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The important role that the Canadian Rangers can play along with the private sector and volunteer groups such as the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary and CASARA (the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association).

(2012,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

Imminent announcement on FWSAR? Or just more delays?

(2011,
issue 6)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Coast Guard Auxiliary performs volunteer search and rescue in the North.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY STEVEN DIETER

65 CF members and three CH-146 Griffon helicopters deployed in August.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

A 737 jet aircraft owned by First Air crashed in heavy fog at Resolute Bay. Luckily it was during Operation Nanook.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The Arctic Council recently signed an international treaty on Cooperation on Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) in the Arctic.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Four key SAR concerns are the focus of upcoming recommendations from the Bloc Québecois.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY LAURIE HAWN

The Parliamentary Standing Committee on National Defence visits Atlantic Canada to review SAR needs.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The Buffalos, which should have been retired 19 years ago, now cost an estimated $20 million a year to maintain operationally.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Are the economics of the Canada First Defence Strategy still workable almost years later?

(2010,
issue 5)
BY JANE KOKAN

Guardians of the North. The Canadian Rangers are an integral part of our Arctic sovereignty. The primary role of this part-time force is to conduct surveillance or sovereignty patrols as required.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The Arctic presents a real opportunity for Canada to be a leader on the subject of Domain Awareness, using this to showcase Canadian thinking and technological expertise.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Can we truly justify sovereignty claims of our Northern lands simply through a few joint exercises held up there during the more ­hospitable months of the year? The simple answer is no.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

There been little input from Arctic communities on how SAR service delivery is provided. This needs to change.

(2010,
issue 3)

The Chief of the Defence Staff takes this opportunity to talk about what the CF is doing well, and where improvement are necessary.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The old curse: “May you live interesting times,” might apply to LGen Deschamp’s tenure as Chief of Air Staff (CAS) – except he would see it as a challenge, not a curse.

(2009,
issue 6)

The Fixed Wing Search and Rescue project is not the longest program in the history of the Department of National Defence, nor is it the most complex or even the most expensive. But it’s well on the way to becoming the most frustrating!

(2009,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

In the role of armed escort aircraft for the Chinooks, Griffons help ensure the safety and effectiveness of the Canadian contingent.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

With a mandate to protect the public, the environment, and security interests, the USCG has been testing its new Ocean Sentry planes in real life SAR.

(2008,
issue 6)

Search & Rescue Satellite Tracking.

(2008,
issue 5)

Making a difference in the lives of Canadian Heroes who serve to make a difference for others.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Melting sea-ice, increased resource development and transpolar air flights, plus renewed interest in the Arctic Basin by our neighbours combine to require a robust air presence to exert Canadian Sovereign rights.

(2008,
issue 4)

The Government must recognize that there is a problem and be prepared to introduce real reforms.

LGen Angus Watt
(2007,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Recruit, train, and equip – these three words sum up the responsibilities of the Chief of the Air Staff – and always with an eye to the future. Long term plans focus on investing in capability, something that has been gradually diminished in recent decades. 

(2007,
issue 3)

Sgt Andrew McLean is the only Canadian attempting the longest distance in the Yukon Arctic Ultra. The search and rescue technician (SARTech) with 435 Squadron of Canadian Forces’ 17 Wing has trained in the chilly winds of his home base of Winnipeg, and feels ready. He is raising money to help establish the new Soldier On program.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

The awarding of procurement contracts should be an economic bonanza for Canadian companies. Unfortunately, the way these contracts are being awarded seriously limits the industrial benefits that Canadian companies had hoped to reap.

(2006,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

''Save Shearwater'' has become the rallying cry of a determined rearguard campaign to roll back the clock on the sale of nearly half of 12 Wing’s base in Shearwater, Nova Scotia. Cogent arguments for its preservation as a key element of Canada’s strategic capability may be for naught. Critics of the divestment argue that reinstating Canada's strategic airlift capability underscores the need to preserve the base in its entirety.

(2006,
issue 5)

The past year saw the Air Force at a turning point, and it is now emerging from a period of significant force reduction that followed the end of the Cold War. With a new focus on transformation, we are now at a point where not only can we see the light at the end of the tunnel, but we can also see beyond. What we see is very promising.

(2005,
issue 6)

The terrorist actions of September 11, 2001, and subsequent tragedies such as the Madrid and London bombings, have highlighted the threat to our public safety, national security, and our economic security.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Our neglect in developing a national SAR strategy has left the Canadian North dangerously vulnerable to more fatal accidents, and we may be called to task.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY JEAN E. MURRAY

Despite immense challenges, Canada’s Search and Rescue system has become one of the best in the world.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The Canadian Forces’ efforts have turned to replacing the aging and increasingly unavailable fleets of CC-130 Hercules and CC-115 Buffalos. What has happened to the ''fast-tracked'' FWSAR requirement?

(2005,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Chief Test Pilot, Gianluca Evangelisti, and Test Pilot, Agostino Frediani, have been with the C-27J Spartan program from the start. Both talked to FrontLine’s Peter Pigott at the Alenia Caselle facility about the aircraft.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS WATTIE

C-295 to become the Air Force’s new fixed-wing search and rescue aircraft.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY E.G. (TED) LENNOX

The need to substantially improve Search and Rescue in the arctic has been clearly articulated for more than five years by three important user groups: the people of Nunavut; the international airlines who fly over Nunavut on flights between North America, Europe and Asia; and the Government of Canada.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY
The Next Wave?

Canada has not possessed any capability for Combat Search and Rescue since the end of the Second World War when Canadian squadrons participated in the rescue of many downed allied airmen, however, this may have to change – and very soon. 

(2005,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Its unique flying characteristics make the helicopter ideally suited to search and rescue missions worldwide.

(2005,
issue 5)

COSPAS-SARSAT has proven itself as a model of international cooperation, working toward the development of space technologies for the benefit of humanity. 

(2005,
issue 5)
BY DON BLAKELY

SAR Units are now are guided by Global Positioning Systems and their radios may even automatically transmit their position.

(2005,
issue 5)

The benefits of community-based policing and the value of the resulting partnerships have long been touted within policing circles.

(2005,
issue 5)
“Everything else is just transportation”

As a whole, SAR Techs are a remarkable group of people, true Canadian heroes who dedicate their lives to helping others and enjoy doing it.

(2005,
issue 5)
Op HUDSON SENTINEL

Effectively carrying out Search and Rescue operations is a significant asset that the Canadian Forces work diligently to maintain.

(2005,
issue 5)

Canada’s area of responsibility for SAR covers over 15.5 million square kilometres, of which over 60% is above the tree line. Given those facts, training for arctic rescue is critical to ensure an appropriate response to distresses in that region. Arctic SAREX is a testament to the Canadian Forces’ dedication that others may live.

RADARSAT-2 GMTI Project
(2005,
issue 5)
BY JEAN BEAUDIN, BY INGAR MOEN

RADARSAT-2 has been designed as a commercial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging satellite.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY DON McLEOD

Canada’s new Defence Policy is a bold and innovative approach to peace and security in the 21st century.

LGen Steve Lucas
(2005,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada’s newest Chief of the Air Staff explains how the transformed Air Force will reposition itself to effectively respond to threats faced in today’s world.

BGen Dwayne Lucas
(2005,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The revolutionary new way of contracting for the Air Force, Optimized Weapons System Support Management, puts more responsibility on industry, but they also gain in the global market by becoming “best of breed.”

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JEAN JACQUES BLAIS

It's unfortunate that the subject of military spending is almost always precipitated by a tragic incident within our armed forces or their inability to respond when needed. This latest tragedy should be a wake up call that we need to seriously examine how we equip our military to represent our nation to the world.

(2004,
issue 4)

Intelligence-gathering and operating agencies do not like to share.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Take a look back.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY JACQUES SIMARD

Examining the suitability of using the CP-140A Arcturus as a SAR replacement for the C-130E Hercules.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For a cost of C$80M, Arcturus SAR would provide both an improved east coast SAR capability and a footprint Canadian Military presence, demonstrating Arctic Sovereignty through increased NORPATs.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The C-295 as a cost-effective means of securing borders and protecting resources. The basic design has been improved to make it a multi-role aircraft, such as for transport of freight, medevac and ­paratroops.