CATEGORIES

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Delivering professional services to Canada’s Critical Infrastructure, Defence, Security, Intelligence, Special Operations and Space communities.

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Curtiss-Wright’s Defense Solutions division specializes in the design and manufacture of a wide range of electronic modules and subsystems, as well as flight test and avionics, aiming and stabilization, shipboard helicopter handling, and instrumentation and control systems.

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Six divisions employ some 2000 people in six provinces and utilize a Canadian supply base of more than 800 companies to design, build, integrate, deliver and service world leading products.

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Develops custom-designed vessel-specific simulation capabilities, including embedded radar, to support military and coast guard training requirements.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

The Air Mobility Training Centre is one of the most advanced and innovative facilities in the world, and is located at CFB Trenton.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Innovative aviation and high-integrity solutions in flight deck avionics, cabin electronics, mission communications, simulation and training, and information management are delivered by a global workforce and service network in more than 150 countries.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

A global leader in integrated live-fire and virtual weapons training systems, Meggitt offers enhanced diagnostics with intelligent Automatic Coaching.

Gregg Centre – Combat Training Centre
(2016,
issue 2)

The Combat Training Centre uses state-of-the-art technologies to enhance soldier and leadership training.These range in complexity from simulation systems to individual vehicle and weapon simulators.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

This Canadian Software development and services company specializes in the design and employment of constructive simulation, collaboration and planning software.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

A global leader in the delivery of training for the defence and security, civil aviation and healthcare markets.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

With now more than 900 highly skilled and experienced Canadian employees, Lockheed has been providing innovative solutions to the Canadian Armed Forces for decades.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

The world leader in live-fire and simulation weapons training solutions, Meggitt offers major expansion in weapons training capability.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

CAE is a Canadian manufacturer of simulation technologies, modelling technologies and training services to airlines, aircraft manufacturers, defense customers, mining companies and healthcare specialists.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

Cubic Corporation is an American public corporation providing diversified systems and services to the transportation and defense markets worldwide.

(2014,
issue 6)

The degree of fidelity in a simulator is closely linked to training effectiveness, and those systems result in savings.

Future Forces
(2006,
issue 2)
BY ANDREW VALLERAND

An example of a major ongoing activity which lends itself to the support of the CF Transformation is the Joint Simulation and Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, Training and Support (JSMARTS) series of exercises.

Future Forces
(2006,
issue 2)
BY ANDRÉ LAFRANCE

The role of ISTAR – There is serious concern about the lack of necessary equipment for a Commander to view the situation in real time, allowing him focused, informed and rapid decisions. New technology must be called upon to provide these tools…

VAdm Bruce MacLean
(2005,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The new emphasis on Security being recognized and supported by the Canadian Government has had a reinforcing effect on the Navy. After decades of downsizing, the Navy is building and diversifying to cover a wide range of security and policing roles on our coasts.

(2005,
issue 4)

In November, 2000 National Defence Headquarters released a concept paper entitled “Creating the CF of 2020.” That paper stated “Given the uncertain nature of the future security environment,” the integrated use of Modeling & Simulation (M&S) is a valuable tool “for forging the best, flexible posture for the future with the resources available... ''

(2005,
issue 4)

In the Navy, shiphandling is a key element in the training and development of bridge officers and teams. It is a complex mix of knowledge, skills and judgment. There has been lively discussion about whether shiphandling is an art or a science, with a general consensus that it includes elements of both.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY DENNIS R. (Doc) HOPPER

Many have considered flight simulators for pilot training to be the “leading edge” of simulation. As the Air Force transforms, the demands for modeling and simulation support in other areas are on the increase.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY INGAR MOEN

The defence technology investment strategy identifies Simulation & Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, Rehearsal, and Training (SMARRT) as a key R&D activity for enabling the development of future force concepts and identifying future capabilities.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY RICK THOMPSON

Modeling and Simulation (M&S) is a key ­component of the wide-ranging ­program of transformation (including advanced mission training) in Canada’s Air Force today. Numerous M&S projects, sponsored by the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS), are intended to increase air power capabilities affordably and effectively.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PAULA O’SHEA

Readily available and cost effective new technologies make it possible to apply simulation to all phases of training - from development through to delivery, management and training support. These technologies can provide training in both the typical classroom setting, and ''on the go''.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY MIKE GREENLEY

Readily available and cost effective new technologies make it possible to apply simulation to all phases of training - from development through to delivery, management and training support. These technologies can provide training in both the typical classroom setting, and ''on the go''.

(2005,
issue 1)
BY DENNIS R. (Doc) HOPPER

In our special “Simulation Series,” FrontLine offers a wide selection of articles covering Modelling and Simulation (M&S) in the Canadian Defence and Security environments. A number of trends have become apparent, such as the tremendous increase in capabilities, the affordability of these new technologies and the innovation and adaptability for application in these sectors.

(2005,
issue 1)

Simulation and Training Technologies are important components of the Canadian Army’s Transformation efforts as it refines and develops capabilities that are relevant to the battlefield of the future.

(2004,
issue 5)

As the exclusive flight test agency of the Canadian Forces, the AETE conducts a wide variety of flight and ground testing involving every aircraft and helicopter type in the Canadian inventory. 

(2004,
issue 2)

Multinational flying packages which are becoming common in ­military operations today. The NFTC offers participating air forces a three-phase training programme for their future fighter pilots using state-of-art software and equipment.