CATEGORIES

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Adapting to anti-submarine warfare (ASW) requires mastering new technologies that provide capabilities to leverage reachback systems, robust networks, and distributed strike options.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Danish government has released a new defence agreement covering the next six years of defense expenditure and planning. It also defines the top two threats to focus on in terms of priorities and spending.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
Treasure Chest or Pandora’s Box?

The federal government’s new Defence Policy is both a promising treasure chest and a potential Pandora’s Box of unintended consequences that would leave the Canadian Armed Forces struggling with more than one “capability gap.”

(2017,
issue 3)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
A bold call for recapitalization & modernization

A bold call for expediting platform replacement and modernization.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Provides support to strategically important assets, infrastructure and training programs – primarily in the Canadian defence, security, marine, and construction sectors.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE
A Global View of the Naval Military Market

Industry and government representatives from around the world gathered to learn about new naval technologies and concepts. 

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The Australian Navy will be acquiring new platforms and is looking closely at the “integrateability” of those new platforms with Army, Air Force – and space capabilities as well.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

DCNS will be working with Australia to ensure an evolving and integrated approach for the build and the sustainment of the submarine.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A look at Australia’s final choice to build a new class of advanced-­capability diesel/electric-powered submarines. Innovative collaboration is changing the way major procurements are benefitting both buyer and seller.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For those who thought Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) was dead, its time to wake up to the fact that submarine numbers worldwide have increased by some 100 boats over the past decade.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

There is a reason the Royal Canadian Navy’s submarine HMCS Windsor and her three sisters, Victoria, Corner Brook and Chicoutimi, carry the imposing moniker of hunter-killer submarines (SSK).

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

One of the world's leading naval system providers, TKMS is acknowledged for superior technological excellence, reliability and longevity.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

The need to defend Canada always leads to a discussion of submarines. Now, climate change gives more credence to the need for nuclear-powered submarines.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Since China became a nuclear power in 1964, they have maintained a small nuclear force. Those assets are being strengthened substantially.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

The Alenia C-27J Spartan is a medium-sized military transport aircraft developed and manufactured by Alenia Aermacchi.

Rear-Admiral John Newton
(2015,
issue 2)

The Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and Joint Force Command Atlantic talks to FrontLine about his priorities.

VAdm Mark Norman
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Getting many new ship builds underway through cooperation with key government departments, ­managing operations with reduced fleets, finding innovative ways to train enough new recruits, and the daunting task of overhauling navy culture, are all key priorities on the Admiral’s plate.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Today, the future of Canada’s submarine service is in doubt. Key experts challenge the topic.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY PETER CAIRNS

A look at the tumultuous issues related to used submarines, with an eye on the future security of Canada.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY NORMAN JOLIN

Does Canada need to incorporate submarine capability to its surveillance and sovereignty requirements?

(2008,
issue 3)

As stealth platforms, submarines are well suited to work either autonomously or with other maritime forces.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The politicization of Canada’s Defence procurement process continued with the recent announcement of a $4.6 billion plan for 16 new aircraft to replace Canada’s fleet of old C-130 Hercules tactical transports just on the eve of the federal election. 

(2005,
issue 4)
BY STAN JACOBSON

Recent issues of FrontLine have discussed the use of simulators in the field of maintenance training. The Canadian Navy was a world leader in the decision to migrate to PC-based maintenance training. This migration began as a result of decisions made in 1992 to support the evolving training requirements of the Canadian Patrol Frigate (CPF) project.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JEAN JACQUES BLAIS

It's unfortunate that the subject of military spending is almost always precipitated by a tragic incident within our armed forces or their inability to respond when needed. This latest tragedy should be a wake up call that we need to seriously examine how we equip our military to represent our nation to the world.