CATEGORIES

(2017,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The rebuilding of Russia’s Northern fleet and its defense bastion built around the Kola Peninsula creates a direct challenge to Norway, and is of strategic interest to all of the Arctic Council States.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Asymmetrical warfare presents a need for Canada to develop its R&D expertise.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Since 1984, Shark Marine Technologies Inc. has been fulfilling its mandate to deliver underwater products and services that are innovative, high quality, dependable and cost effective. Delivering on that mandate, the company has gained global respect for its developments in undersea technology and the creative solutions it delivers to unusual and challenging applications.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

Rheinmetall Canada is a proud member of Germany’s Rheinmetall Group, a market leader in the areas of environmentally friendly mobility and threat-appropriate security technology. Rheinmetall Defence is Europe’s foremost supplier of army technology and a longstanding partner of the armed forces.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE
A Global View of the Naval Military Market

Industry and government representatives from around the world gathered to learn about new naval technologies and concepts. 

(2016,
issue 4)

Determined to avoid the ad hoc way in which pieces of a larger system of ­systems are too often selected, the RCN has completed work that will guide a holistic acquisition approach to MUxS.

(2016,
issue 3)

The RCN has identified a clear need for new boats with tactical capabilities, here's why.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

Airbus D&S is the second largest space business worldwide and a top-10 global defence enterprise.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

Specializing in Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions for military and commercial applications worldwide.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

With now more than 900 highly skilled and experienced Canadian employees, Lockheed has been providing innovative solutions to the Canadian Armed Forces for decades.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

This leading global security company provides innovative systems, products and solutions in autonomous systems, cyber, C4ISR, logistics and modernization to government and commercial customers worldwide.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY JEAN-MARC TANGUY

After years of research and investment, robotic technology deserves a greatly expanded role in many areas.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems provides unmanned aerial vehicles and radar solutions for the U.S. military and commercial applications worldwide.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TOP DEFENCE CAPABILITIES 2015
Defence Capability Leaders

Tulmar supports the Defence and Aerospace industries with innovative solutions. Through a responsive and engaged workforce, we deliver products and services that help save lives.

Lt-Gen Deptula, USAF Deputy Chief of Staff: ISR
(2013,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Could the most significant post-Afghan development of unmanned vehicles be to shape cooperative relationships with indigenous forces in pursuit of shared counter-insurgency objective.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Robotic vehicles can be a critically important tool for protection of sovereignty infrastructure in Canada’s Arctic and ocean spaces.

(2010,
issue 5)

Will Canada step up to become a global leader in the transition of military unmanned systems into the civil and commercial sector? There are many possible commercial applications for unmanned vehicle systems.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In FrontLine’s continuing focus on the defence procurement system, we bring you the thoughtful response from Janet Thorsteinson to an important question recently posed by Dan Ross, ADM(Mat): “Is too much risk being passed to vendors?”

(2008,
issue 2)
BY ROBERT DAY

Once upon a time, not so long ago, Canada was an aerospace powerhouse.

LGen Angus Watt
(2007,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Recruit, train, and equip – these three words sum up the responsibilities of the Chief of the Air Staff – and always with an eye to the future. Long term plans focus on investing in capability, something that has been gradually diminished in recent decades. 

Future Forces
(2006,
issue 2)

The proliferation of the Unmanned Vehicle System is evidence of a new path for defence and security. What is the future for these systems and how will technological advances develop for either homeland security or defence missions?…

(2005,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In Brief

(2005,
issue 6)

Last month, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) led international surveillance-oriented trials off the coast of Nova Scotia. The 3-week long Maritime Sensor Integration Experiment (MARSIE) trial will directly contribute to Canada’s ability to conduct high-tech surveillance and secure its coastal approaches against potential threats and illegal activities.

(2005,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

Imagine more than 700 aircraft in a country’s airspace in one day. Not generally a big deal. Then imagine them without a single pilot aboard.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY JOHN LEECH

The maritime environment is well known for its inherent dangers, quite apart from those always present in naval operations. Small wonder, then, that “those in peril on the sea” are right out there in the use and development of unmanned vehicles to help accomplish the mission.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY JOHN LEECH

Last Fall, the Canadian Chief of the Air Staff, in an outline of the future vision for Air Force transformation, announced that the need for high-quality real-time intelligence will lead the Air Force into an unprecedented focus on multi-sensor-equipped, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

(2005,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

The military uses of unmanned (uninhabited!) vehicles have increased dramatically in the last few years.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY JOHN LEECH

Unmanned systems are becoming apart of our lives now.

(2004,
issue 2)

An overview of Findland's safety and defence technologies and concepts. 

(2004,
issue 2)
BY INGAR MOEN

A key concept for military transformation and future ops of the new security ­environment.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Welcome to the new FrontLine. This new magazine brings together many well-known writers and industry experts to offer another voice on the defence and enforcement scene. With the Canadian public becoming more and more aware of the issues and challenges in this sector, we certainly believe there is a need for this new publication.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY INGAR MOEN, BY HAROLD STOCKER

The future military is likely to include a collaborating, inter­operable mix of humans and technologically smart entities, called Autonomous Intelligent Systems.

Unmanned Vehicles Take Off – Again
(2004,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

Thanks to the timely work of a new association called UVS Canada and their first major conference, "Momentum 2003," held recently in Ottawa, there is now a focus and a platform for the kind of collaboration necessary to start exploring this potential.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY ED STOREY

A ceremony by the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment on Lodge Lees Farm in Kent, England marked the repatriation of several WWII artifacts.