CATEGORIES

Interview: BGen Mike Nixon
(2018,
issue 2)
BY JANE KOKAN

The Canadian Armed Forces and Canadian Rangers participate regularly in security and sovereignty exercises. Kids are the future of the North, says BGen Mike Nixon, Commander of Joint Task Force North. 

(2017,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

The Arctic draws global interest for several reasons. Operation Nanook is one of a series of northern deployments that provides the opportunity for the Canadian Armed Forces to be a catalyst to bring partnerships together for common cause and to provide help and assistance when and wherever necessary.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY JANE KOKAN

Canadian soldiers participating in Op Nanook consider the lessons learned.

(2016,
issue 5)
One Great Step for Canadian Space

In today's revolving door of priorities, is it possible for Canada to draft a clearly conceived, space policy for security and environmental surveillance that can be counted on to meet evolving needs?

(2016,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

A five-nation review by SIPRI looks at the prospects of increased tensions and notes that only Russia has "significantly" increased its Arctic capabilities.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For those who thought Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) was dead, its time to wake up to the fact that submarine numbers worldwide have increased by some 100 boats over the past decade.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

To ­protect and exploit the valuable energy supplies on its continental shelf, Norway has established approaches and procedures for the future development of energy supplies in its key High North / Arctic region.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD
From Stable to Scramble

With growing strategic importance of the region, the five coastal states bordering the Arctic Ocean are watching threats.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY FRONTLINE

Who's Where, Defence Industry Notes; Gregg Centre Combat Training Centre; Arctic News. 

(2016,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

These last few years have seen a flurry of activity. The bids have now been submitted – finally setting the stage for first delivery of new aircraft. FrontLine looks at the process and the contenders.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY RON BUCK
How Many, and What Capabilities?

Does Canada need to retain this capability, and how many ships do we really need?

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

The growing concern over maritime and arctic safety and security issues is the imperative from which this important conference is growing.

(2015,
issue 5)

Now with a new government, a serious review of Canada’s defence policy is urgently called for.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A recurring theme in many FrontLine articles over the last decade, the need for a clarification of vital national interests on which to articulate clear policy reverberates strongly in this edition.

Defence Capability Leaders 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

The MASS15 conference will bring together and showcase organizations that play a key role in the execution of Maritime & Arctic Security & Safety.

Defence Capability Leaders 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

Tulmar supports the Defence and Aerospace industries with innovative solutions. Through a responsive and engaged workforce, we deliver products and services that help save lives.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY LEE CARSON

Press coverage has generated new awareness of Canada’s Arctic, but what does it mean for Canada?

(2014,
issue 2)

Officer cadets apply the knowledge and training to successfully summit the icy challenges of Mt. Washington in the dead of winter.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Deliberations on optional budget reductions must examine some sacred cows that have escaped scrutiny, largely because of ignorance, apathy or cowardice. Consider these gutsy ideas when cutting the defence budget.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

A robust Marine Domain Awareness (MDA) capability must be developed as an element of Canada’s northern strategy.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Canada could be in a pole position to shape allied efforts for an Arctic C2 and ISR grid to cover the High North.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD, BY RICHARD BRAY

For maximum leverage in future acquisitions, Canada should find key opportunities in global supply chains.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Can a single-mission aircraft meet multiple government goals in the Far North?

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

New Canadian systems can add real life time connectivity to the high Arctic.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY JANE KOKAN

Inuit communities are ready, willing and able to contribute in the high North.

(2013,
issue 5)

In the Arctic, even a game of war can be a serious battle against the elements.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

As frustration levels rise among those involved in defence procurement, FrontLine responds by publishing additional rounds of constructive commentaries in this and coming editions.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The Project Manager (2000-2005) recalls the original SOR process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The procurement of FWSAR aircraft has waxed and waned for over a decade.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY LLOYD CAMPBELL

The CP-140 Aurora is arguably the most effective strategic C4ISR platform available.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY JAMES PARKER

Would multi-purpose vessels be more cost-effective than an Icebreaker and Patrol Ships?

General Charles Jacoby
(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

As the Arctic ice shrinks, the vulnerabilities grow. A conversation about Arctic strategy with Commander NORAD and NORTHCOM, U.S. General Charles Jacoby.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

While the planet heats up, defence budgets are melting down. Canadian defence planners need a sharper focus on a hotter Arctic.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Can unmanned systems help Canada exercise sovereignty effectively and cost-efficiently?

(2012,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE, BY RICHARD BRAY

The Royal Canadian Air Force’s hopes of having new FWSAR aircraft in service by 2015 received a boost, of sorts when PWGSC released an LOI to potential suppliers. But new options are appearing on the horizon.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

Is Canada's sovereignty vulnerable? The answer obviously depends on our level of political and financial commitment. How does the NSPS fit into this equation?

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence Procurement, SAR and Communication Control.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) program is already running into heavy weather.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The important role that the Canadian Rangers can play along with the private sector and volunteer groups such as the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary and CASARA (the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association).

(2011,
issue 6)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Coast Guard Auxiliary performs volunteer search and rescue in the North.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Five Canadian fighter jets and 144 personnel policed the skies over Iceland.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

A 737 jet aircraft owned by First Air crashed in heavy fog at Resolute Bay. Luckily it was during Operation Nanook.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The Arctic Council recently signed an international treaty on Cooperation on Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) in the Arctic.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY PIERRE LEBLANC

Canada is only scratching the surface of future Cdn Ranger contributions in the North.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Four key SAR concerns are the focus of upcoming recommendations from the Bloc Québecois.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY LAURIE HAWN

The Parliamentary Standing Committee on National Defence visits Atlantic Canada to review SAR needs.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY GILLES CHAMPOUX

Can Aboriginal toponymy be part of a solution to assert sovereignty in the Canadian Arctic?

(2011,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The Buffalos, which should have been retired 19 years ago, now cost an estimated $20 million a year to maintain operationally.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Are the economics of the Canada First Defence Strategy still workable almost years later?

(2010,
issue 5)
BY JANE KOKAN

Guardians of the North. The Canadian Rangers are an integral part of our Arctic sovereignty. The primary role of this part-time force is to conduct surveillance or sovereignty patrols as required.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The Arctic presents a real opportunity for Canada to be a leader on the subject of Domain Awareness, using this to showcase Canadian thinking and technological expertise.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Can we truly justify sovereignty claims of our Northern lands simply through a few joint exercises held up there during the more ­hospitable months of the year? The simple answer is no.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

There been little input from Arctic communities on how SAR service delivery is provided. This needs to change.

(2010,
issue 3)

The Chief of the Defence Staff takes this opportunity to talk about what the CF is doing well, and where improvement are necessary.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The old curse: “May you live interesting times,” might apply to LGen Deschamp’s tenure as Chief of Air Staff (CAS) – except he would see it as a challenge, not a curse.

(2009,
issue 6)

The Fixed Wing Search and Rescue project is not the longest program in the history of the Department of National Defence, nor is it the most complex or even the most expensive. But it’s well on the way to becoming the most frustrating!

(2008,
issue 6)

To defend Canada, we must have domain awareness of maritime and Arctic approaches. Using RADARSAT 2, Project Polar Epsilon, a joint space-based wide area surveillance and support capability, will provide the signal-processing infrastructure for improved surveillance.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Melting sea-ice, increased resource development and transpolar air flights, plus renewed interest in the Arctic Basin by our neighbours combine to require a robust air presence to exert Canadian Sovereign rights.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In FrontLine’s continuing focus on the defence procurement system, we bring you the thoughtful response from Janet Thorsteinson to an important question recently posed by Dan Ross, ADM(Mat): “Is too much risk being passed to vendors?”

(2008,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Will Canada Command play a key role?

(2008,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Is this the Avro Arrow spelled backward? What does the sale of national security assets mean for Canada’s Foreign Policy?

(2007,
issue 6)
BY HUGUES CANUEL

The ships and submarines of the Canadian Navy have maintained a remarkable tempo of operations at home and abroad. Important progress has been made in laying out the foundations of the recapitalization process required for the long term.

(2006,
issue 5)

HMCS Montréal’s 2006 Northern Deployment must be viewed within the context of renewed interest in Arctic sovereignty by the Conservative government. Neglect of Arctic sovereignty as a policy priority may have significant negative consequences and unresolved jurisdictional disputes in Canada’s North have arguably become more pressing for recent governments.

(2005,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

Imagine more than 700 aircraft in a country’s airspace in one day. Not generally a big deal. Then imagine them without a single pilot aboard.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Our neglect in developing a national SAR strategy has left the Canadian North dangerously vulnerable to more fatal accidents, and we may be called to task.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY JEAN E. MURRAY

Despite immense challenges, Canada’s Search and Rescue system has become one of the best in the world.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The Canadian Forces’ efforts have turned to replacing the aging and increasingly unavailable fleets of CC-130 Hercules and CC-115 Buffalos. What has happened to the ''fast-tracked'' FWSAR requirement?

(2005,
issue 5)
BY E.G. (TED) LENNOX

The need to substantially improve Search and Rescue in the arctic has been clearly articulated for more than five years by three important user groups: the people of Nunavut; the international airlines who fly over Nunavut on flights between North America, Europe and Asia; and the Government of Canada.

(2005,
issue 5)
Op HUDSON SENTINEL

Effectively carrying out Search and Rescue operations is a significant asset that the Canadian Forces work diligently to maintain.

(2005,
issue 5)

Canada’s area of responsibility for SAR covers over 15.5 million square kilometres, of which over 60% is above the tree line. Given those facts, training for arctic rescue is critical to ensure an appropriate response to distresses in that region. Arctic SAREX is a testament to the Canadian Forces’ dedication that others may live.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

There is only one way to ensure that Canadian sovereignty is protected, and that is through the ability of the nation to exercise joint military power in concert with a strong foreign policy and an able diplomatic service.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JOHN LEECH

FrontLine had the opportunity to chat with the Commandant about the Atlantic Littoral ISR Experiment (ALIX), the largest major undertaking in the ongoing CFEC program.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY JACQUES SIMARD

Examining the suitability of using the CP-140A Arcturus as a SAR replacement for the C-130E Hercules.

(2004,
issue 2)

An overview of Findland's safety and defence technologies and concepts. 

Maritime Security
(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

Traditionally, we have been a nation that “reacts” to crises, but Canada has a part to play in this international Security and Intelligence transformation.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For a cost of C$80M, Arcturus SAR would provide both an improved east coast SAR capability and a footprint Canadian Military presence, demonstrating Arctic Sovereignty through increased NORPATs.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The C-295 as a cost-effective means of securing borders and protecting resources. The basic design has been improved to make it a multi-role aircraft, such as for transport of freight, medevac and ­paratroops.