CATEGORIES

Interview: LGen Christopher Coates
(2019,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

To get the insider perspective on the future of NORAD and how important Canada’s participation in this effort is, FrontLine spoke to Deputy Commander Lieutenant-General Christopher Coates from his post at NORAD HQ, Peterson Air Force Base in El Paso County, Colorado Springs.

(2019,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

How legislative and regulatory changes will affect future military exports is unclear at this stage, but begs a fundamental question: is it possible to keep the sticky hands of politics out of it?

(2019,
issue 1)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

Russian President Vladimir Putin has given a priority for the development of the domestic land and airborne forces in the newly approved state armament program.

(2019,

Boeing Co. has secured a contract valued at nearly $46 million to upgrade training of aircrews on P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft flown by the U.S. Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. Funding was approved in 2017 and with most of the work being done in the U.S., completion is expected in 2022.

(2019,

Two huge industrial agglomerations are competing to develop “sixth generation” fighters. A British-Swedish-Italian partnership involves MDBA, Rolls Royce and BAE Systems as well as three Italian companies: Leonardo, Elettronica Group and Avio Aero (a GE Aviation subsidiary). A German-French-Spanish effort involves Airbus and Dassault.

(2019,

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif visited Biarritz, France, during the latest meeting of G7 leaders at the invitation of the Summit host, President Emmanual Macron. Zarif is reported to have gone directly into a meeting with his French counterpart, Jean-Yves Le Drian.

(2019,

Teija Tiilikainen, Director of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs since 2010, has been appointed Director of the European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats for a five-year term.The agency brings together members of NATO and the EU to provide training on hybrid threats. Tiilikainen’s predecessor,Matti Saarelainen, moves Oct. 1 to the Finnish Security Intelligence.

(2019,

Three years ago, Norad sought reassurance, at the highest levels of the military, that Canada was on top of the evolving threat of cyber vulnerability of Canadian Forces bases and related civilian infrastructure. The request by then NORAD Commander U.S. Adm William Gourtney advised General Vance to "work with Public Safety Canada to identify civilian infrastructure that is critical to CAF and Norad missions."

(2019,

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un is reported by state media to have supervised test-firings of an unspecified new weapons system, extending a streak of launches as his country tried to drive a wedge between the U.S. and South Korea. In a separate statement, his foreign ministry said that future “peace talks” would exclude South Korea.

(2019,

A study prepared by a group at a major Australian university concludes that China has supplanted the U.S. as the primary presence in the Indo-Pacific region. The report by the U.S. Study Centre at the University of Sydney cites China’s progress in missile and other technologies and echoes a  report to Congress last year by the National Defense Strategy Commission.

(2019,

More than a year of partisan bickering in Italy has led to the collapse of its national government. Critics have accused the populist coalition administration of isolating and weakening Italy as it tries to reorient its place within Europe.

(2018,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The evolution of the role of fighters is at the center of the shift to recraft combat capabilities and operations as operational contexts change.

(2018,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

The six RCAF pilots on this Op Reassurance deployment work with Romanian Air Force fighters for air policing and alert response.

(2018,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

The Military Flying Training System (MFTS), a contract that facilitates the Ministry of Defence (MOD) in preparing aircrews for eventual assignment to frontline squadrons,  is operated by Lockheed Martin and Babcock International, using Airbus helicopters.

(2018,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The challenge of the 21st century incorporates incredibly invasive infrastructure threats. Direct defence strategies must quickly include these threats as part of any comprehensive national security concept.

(2018,
issue 6)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Over the past half-decade, a growing chorus of former government officials and retired generals have argued that Canada should reverse its long-held position of non-participation and formally join the United States’ continental Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) program. How does that look as we close out 2018?

(2018,
issue 6)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

Russia is finishing a large-scale expansion of its fleet of combat helicopters and planning a further focus on selective supplies, according to the Russian Defence Ministry and leading combat aviation experts.

(2018,
issue 5)
BY J. PAUL de B. TAILLON

In response to the ongoing political, financial and economic uncertainty and instability, strategists at Germany’s Ministry of Defence developed six possible scenarios and the potential cascading political consequences.

(2018,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Fully operational by mid-August, the Canadian task force is fully involved in logistical support, ferrying UN soldiers around the country in Chinook and Griffon helicopters for “presence projection” missions.

(2018,
issue 4)

Activity on the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) procurement project, the “Crown Jewel” of the Government’s National Shipbuilding Strategy, is in a holding pattern while Irving reviews the bids submitted by teams for Alion, BAE and Navantia.

(2018,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The Nordic perspective on the importance of the cross-border training and how it affects allied relationships across NATO.

(2018,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, NATO’s worst fears could be summed up in two words: Warsaw Pact. Nowadays, it seems, two other words have come to represent NATO’s worst fears: Donald Trump. What kind of impact is Trump having on NATO?

(2018,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS KILFORD

For some time now, Turkey has been increasingly seen as NATO’s “odd-man out”.  The reasons given for this assessment are many, but are they justified?

(2018,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The usually calm Canadian summer has been disrupted by the unfortunate penchant for political tweets.

UP FOR DEBATE: Arguing the Affirmative
(2018,
issue 3a)
BY TIM DUNNE

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization must replace the Secretary General. It's time Canada be recognized for its longtime commitment and many contributions.

UP FOR DEBATE: Arguing Against
(2018,
issue 3a)
BY BRETT BOUDREAU

Canada does not deserve, should not expect, and should not want to join the list of NATO Secretary-Generals anytime soon. The four main reasons can be summed up in four Cs (capability, contributions, candidates, and continent).

(2018,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In taking the lead to highlight innovation, we will endeavour to provide publicity to the companies that are making a difference today. In our Fall edition, we will be initiating a special FrontLine Innovation Platform (FLIP) across multiple industries related to Defence and Safety and Security. 

(2018,
issue 3)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Helicopters and personnel will be deployed to Mali in August to augment what is arguably the most challenging UN mission in recent years. In addition to the challenges of protecting its own assets while supporting other members of the coalition, is the prospect of introducing female troops and personnel into a conflict zone where Muslim extremists control large swaths of the country.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS KILFORD

The Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) is only as good as the troops and support it gets from contributing countries.

UP FOR DEBATE
(2018,
issue 3)

The typical 4-year term of the Secretary General of NATO – now held by Mr. Jens Stoltenberg (former Prime Minister of Norway) – was extended by two more years to 2020. Our debaters present vastly opposing views on the merits of proposing a Canadian SecGen for 2020. Read on.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Expanded tool sets used by adversaries to influence culture, actions and decisions of liberal democracies is the focus of a new Centre of Excellence in Europe.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS
We need to think as hard as we fight

The global threat environment has become more complex because of lawfare and hybrid warfare. Canada must respond with interlinked policies of defence and security; foreign affairs; economic and international trade; and environment. These issues cannot be viewed in isolation.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY ERIC C. ANDERSON
Russia jamming U.S. drones over Syria

In another blow to America’s revolution in military affairs, Russian forces operating in Syria have initiated an electronic war targeting the hand and catapult-launched drones. Washington knew it was only a matter of time before its foes would be capable of jamming or spoofing U.S. tactical collection platforms.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY DAVID BERCUSON

While some nations work at putting conflict behind them, others work harder to achieve global dominance.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

After an intense 8-year period of modernization and recapitalization, the Russian government is set to cut its naval investment to 2,6 trillion rubles ($54B CAD).

(2018,
issue 3)
BY FRONTLINE

MDA, Raytheon, Naval Group, Lockheed Martin Canada, MBDA

(2018,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

The more things change, the more they stay the same. NATO, ATT, international trade, human rights abuses – can anyone get it right?

(2018,
issue 2)
BY JAMES FRYER
– a tangled web

How can the public understand why an interim buy of fighter jets is suddenly necessary to ensure Canada’s security, when 13 former Air Force Commanders can’t either?

(2018,
issue 2)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Being ready for the next battles, and anticipating new forms of combat beyond Maginot lines that may be required to “bring tomorrow’s topics to the table”, and especially where national political decision-makers meet, is key. It is therefore important to raise the technological awareness of NATO member leaders.

(2018,
issue 1)
BY DAVID BERCUSON

Is NATO preparing to deal with the rise of political autarchy? A look at the options available under current constraints.

(2018,
issue 1)

Defence diplomacy is the means that builds and maintains alliances and partnerships, secures influence and informs broader understanding of the international defence and security environment.

(2018,
issue 1)

Examining the Trump Administration’s record, is it as radical as it seems on the surface, or is it mainstream with a flare for overstatement?

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Airbus is a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services. It is also a leader in providing tanker, combat, transport and mission aircraft, as well as one of the world’s largest space companies.

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Business groups include: Land Communications, Airborne Mission Systems, Underwater Warfare and Public Safety and Security Solutions to equip and protect military and first responders.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A former MP is revisiting the "detainee" question, suggesting Canadian soldiers committed war crimes when handing captives over to the local authorities.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Canada has a long and usually proud record in the world of international peacekeeping. But the world has changed, and with it, the nature of the mission. Now called "peace enforcement" – it is very dangerous.

(2017,
issue 5)

A call for people of honour to raise a united voice and continue an unwaivering fight against those who encourage hatred, fear, and uniformity of thought and appearance and lifestyle. 

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Adapting to anti-submarine warfare (ASW) requires mastering new technologies that provide capabilities to leverage reachback systems, robust networks, and distributed strike options.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Danish government has released a new defence agreement covering the next six years of defense expenditure and planning. It also defines the top two threats to focus on in terms of priorities and spending.

Interview: General James E. Cartwright
(2017,
issue 5)

General James E. Cartwright, former commander United States Strategic Command (STRATCOM), and 8th Vice-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff discusses disruptive potential of hypersonic technology and weapons.

(2017,
issue 5)

A look at how Canadian Diplomats abroad create and maintain the important face-to-face relationships that keep diplomacy working.

U.S. defence & security
(2017,
issue 5)
BY ELEANOR DAVIDSON

The defence budget for 2018 does not indicate a fundamental shift in American defence and security affairs.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY FRONTLINE

Airbus Helicopters, BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA, and Ultra Electronics

(2017,
issue 4)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Rather than ‘revisionist’, a more accurate definition for China is that of an exemptionalist power which exempts itself from global rules and processes.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The rebuilding of Russia’s Northern fleet and its defense bastion built around the Kola Peninsula creates a direct challenge to Norway, and is of strategic interest to all of the Arctic Council States.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY DANNY LAM

Canada’s government is looking at the problem posed by North Korea from the wrong perspective. Extortion is looming as the basis for DPRK's nuclear arsenal.

(2017,
issue 3)

Students plan and execute Close Air Support missions safely and effectively. 

(2017,
issue 3)
What is it for?

For at least a decade, China has been developing naval assets, not simply for the defence of its coastal waters, but to project power into the region. 

(2017,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

At the heart of a planned strengthening of Russia’s Western military grouping is the revival of the 1st Tank Army.

(2017,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

The politico-military alliance, originally envisaged by the US, Britain and Canada in 1947, has grown into today’s soon-to-be 29-nation alliance, but Canada has never led the organization.

(2017,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The political and military alliance of NATO has stood the test of time for the past 69 years and has expanded into the global commons of cyber, space, the oceans and airspace.

(2017,
issue 2)

There is nothing wrong with being willing to open Canada to more Chinese trade and investment. But in seeking those desirable goals, the government needs to keep a few facts uppermost in mind.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Norway is in an especially interesting and perhaps precarious situation or, put another way, is at the crossroads of 21st century history.

Lessons Learned
(2017,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

At the annual CDA conference, Interim leader Rona Ambrose shared her thoughts on the defence policy review and defence procurement.

(2017,
issue 1)
BY MARK WILLIS

Mixed messages from the U.S. create uncertainty over the future of NATO and European security.

(2017,
issue 1)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Concerns are growing over Trump's views and impact on both nuclear-armed states and others (state and non-state) with nuclear aspirations.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

World renowned for design, construction and integration of state-of-the-art warships, as well as ship repairs and modernization, Integrated Platform Management systems, Fire Control systems, Command and Control systems, and Propulsion Plants. 

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

A market leader in environmentally-friendly mobility and threat-appropriate security technologies, Rheinmetall Canada employs 275 people in Canada.

Top Defence Capabilities 2017
(2017,
issue 0)

This world leader in firearm manufacturing has been producing quality firearms since 1852. Its new M&P 2.0 polymer pistol is loaded with features and benefits tailored for the military and police user.

(2017,

President Trump is proposing a $54 Billion surge in U.S. military spending for new ships and aircraft (including fighters) in his first federal budget – while slashing big chunks from domestic programs and foreign aid to make the government "do more with less."

(2017,

The British House of Commons has been suspended due to an incident on Westminster Bridge. Police in London have confirmed that one attacker has been shot after mowing down pedestrians before crashing through the gates of the Palace and then stabbing a police officer. One person is dead and at least 10 people have been  injured. Police have not determined yet if the assailant was working alone or not.

(2017,

Iraqi forces are reporting the capture of two Canadians among 20 other women with Daesh forces after the fall of Mosul. Global Affairs Canada has not confirmed the report.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY JANE KOKAN

A look at the new peace support mission realities as the government considers its UN obligations.

Maritime Tactical Operations Group
(2016,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

A new tactical requirement to patrol and protect maritime trade routes has created a resurgence of vessel boardings and searches.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

For a procurement to be legal, it must comply with both the Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) and the Government’s Contract Regulations (GCR).

(2016,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

Peacekeeping is one of the most visible and ostensibly celebrated United Nations activities, but the nature and scope has evolved significantly since 1948.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Diffusion is happening in an uneven manner, with powerful state and non-state actors vice militarily (where U.S. still dominates). 

(2016,
issue 6)
BY JANE KOKAN

Canadian soldiers participating in Op Nanook consider the lessons learned.

(2016,
issue 6)

With a critical role in humanitarian efforts and foreign installations, heavy equipment fleets are put to the test.

Russia to expand military aviation fleet by 2020
(2016,
issue 6)

Russia is in the process of expanding and modernizing its national military aviation fleet (manned and unmanned) by 2020. 

(2016,
issue 6)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

After two decades of military cuts and reductions, Germany has decided that a rebound in defence spending is in order. 

(2016,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Industry and government representatives from around the world gathered to learn about new naval technologies and concepts. 

NATO: Diplomacy, Defence, Development
(2016,
issue 5)
BY CORNEL TURDEANU, BY JAZLYN MELNYCHUK

It’s no secret that the Canadian Armed Forces, as an organization, is faced with a public relations crisis on Canadian university campuses. Simon Fraser University takes on the challenge of mentoring university ­students to understand the importance of NATO and the complex ­military component of peace.

(2016,
issue 5)

In today's revolving door of priorities, is it possible for Canada to draft a clearly conceived, space policy for security and environmental surveillance that can be counted on to meet evolving needs?

(2016,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Is it surprisingly ironic, or sadly inevitable, that the Liberals have begun to reach too far in a quest for control? On 27 October 2016, in a clarification to previous wording, the Government of Canada forbade any private companies interested in work on the CSC project (primes or subs) from any form of public announcement or promotion without prior consent from Irving Shipbuilding. This dangerous first step must be reversed – entirely.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY SERGEY IVANOV

Establishment of its Space Forces and expansion of its constellation of ­military satellites will significantly increase Russia’s military potential in outer and near space.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

A five-nation review by SIPRI looks at the prospects of increased tensions and notes that only Russia has "significantly" increased its Arctic capabilities.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The Australian Navy will be acquiring new platforms and is looking closely at the “integrateability” of those new platforms with Army, Air Force – and space capabilities as well.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

DCNS will be working with Australia to ensure an evolving and integrated approach for the build and the sustainment of the submarine.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Diffusion is happening in an uneven manner, with powerful state and non-state actors vice militarily, where the U.S. is still by far the most dominant. Other states are developing niche capabilities that increasingly limit Washington’s freedom to manoeuvre in East Asia.

(2016,
issue 5)

Who’s Where / Royals visit from Norway / Arctic research funding / Aerospace funding

(2016,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A look at Australia’s final choice to build a new class of advanced-­capability diesel/electric-powered submarines. Innovative collaboration is changing the way major procurements are benefitting both buyer and seller.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For those who thought Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) was dead, its time to wake up to the fact that submarine numbers worldwide have increased by some 100 boats over the past decade.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Obligations to shareholders and the ­markets are all very nice and, frankly, understandable. But what about ­obligations to taxpayers everywhere who ultimately foot the bills?

(2016,
issue 3)
BY BRETT BOUDREAU

StratCom cannot erase the outcomes of bad policy and poor operational execution. A look at the successes and shortcomings of NATO Strategic Communications during the ISAF mission.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY JAMES PARKER

Canada is not alone in suffering serious naval equipment design and procurement problems. The list of dilemmas that effect naval procurement around the world is long and varied. 

(2016,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

The Russian Ministry of Defence plans to significantly accelerate R&D activities.

The way ahead: Opening the mission sets
(2016,
issue 3)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

U.S. Admiral Gortney talks of the need to widen the scope of the NORAD/NORTHCOM role.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

WWII Spitfire and Hurricane pilot epitomizes the dedication and humility of wartime service.

(2016,
issue 2)

Brazil’s military is currently struggling to sort out what they can continue to fund, what can be delayed, and what must simply be abandoned.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

To ­protect and exploit the valuable energy supplies on its continental shelf, Norway has established approaches and procedures for the future development of energy supplies in its key High North / Arctic region.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

With growing strategic importance of the region, the five coastal states bordering the Arctic Ocean are watching threats.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY FERRY DE KERCKHOVE

Considering how quickly transformative world events have been happening of late, you might want to read this overview rapidly! (also in french)

Russia’s Maskirovka as a Doctrine
(2016,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

History is replete with examples of brilliant military deception at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels, alike. Can lessons be applied today?

The United Kingdom’s Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

An assessment of Britain's National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 and how it impacts defence recapitalization.

2016 Defence White Paper
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

A look at key drivers to Australia's Security environment and the pace of military modernization.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Air dominance needs to be established and ensured, rather than assumed.

National Interests
(2016,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Do Canadians know how vulnerable the submarine fiber-optic cables are, and should we protect this critical infrastructure?

(2016,
issue 1)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Having nuclear weapons clearly creates its own level of deterrence among nuclear powers, great or newer. Is there a risk of such weapons falling into terrorist hands?

(2016,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The Liberal Government has chosen to step back and make real change rather than incremental adjustments that tend to bog down the system with numerous workarounds...

(2016,
issue 1)
BY RON BUCK

Does Canada need to retain this capability, and how many ships do we really need?

Vue d’ensemble :
(2016,
issue 0)
BY FERRY DE KERCKHOVE

Bien que le document Perspectives stratégiques 2016 effectue une analyse en profondeur des crises dans le monde et entame une réflexion sur les incidences pour le Canada, sa sécurité, et ses priorités en matière de défense, nous en donnons aux lecteurs de Frontline un résumé succinct.  Étant donné la rapidité avec laquelle des événements transformateurs se produisent dans le monde, nous vous conseillons de le lire rapidement!

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

With a reputation for innovation and excellence, CMC designs, manufactures and supports electronics products for the aviation market.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

With now more than 900 highly skilled and experienced Canadian employees, Lockheed has been providing innovative solutions to the Canadian Armed Forces for decades.

(2016,

The Trudeau government successfully campaigned on pledges to end Canadian involvement in Iraq and restore this country's peacekeeping role. One year later, Canadians are still fighting in Iraq and peacekeeping in Mali has been anything but peaceful for United Nations soldiers.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Minister Sajjan’s credentials and influence within cabinet and caucus are going to be tested in the coming months.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

The need to defend Canada always leads to a discussion of submarines. Now, climate change gives more credence to the need for nuclear-powered submarines.

(2015,
issue 6)

An in-depth update of the NSPS, particularly as it relates to Canada's new Surface Combatants program.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Known as "no-go" zones to police, dozens of areas in France have become “notorious” as enclaves of Muslims who are resisting Western rule of law.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

Amid the existing Russian threat, Ukraine continues active militarization and strengthening of its national army on a massive scale.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

With strained resources, Ukraine is dependent on foreign assistance and charity to shore-up the financial and technical shortcomings of its war effort.

Defence Procurement Process
(2015,
issue 5)
BY GEORGE MacDONALD

The latest DPS Report Card indicates the process has become more complex, and questions the process of restricting innovation options.

(2015,
issue 5)

Now with a new government, a serious review of Canada’s defence policy is urgently called for.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY TIM LYNCH

A robust foreign policy requires a robust defence policy – were both lacking for the mission in Afghanistan?

(2015,
issue 5)
BY SUNIL RAM

Examining the complex impacts of asserting military control in a volatile region.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Since China became a nuclear power in 1964, they have maintained a small nuclear force. Those assets are being strengthened substantially.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Is it essential to include Mexico as an equal defence partner with Canada and the United States?

(2015,
issue 5)
BY MARK WILLIS

"We cannot defend our European way of life if we don’t do more for our defence”, says Poland’s foreign minister.

Commander Peter Bergen Henegouwen (Royal Netherlands Navy)
(2015,
issue 5)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Standing NATO Mine Counter-Measures Group One (SNMCMG 1) contributes to keeping sea trade safe and open.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A strategy built around shaping innovative ways to integrate assets in support of air and joint operations.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY JEAN-MARC TANGUY

After years of research and investment, robotic technology deserves a greatly expanded role in many areas.

Commodore Brian Santarpia
(2015,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

From the Combined Task Force (CTF) 150 headquarters in Bahrain, Commodore Brian Santarpia commanded the ships and aircraft of 30 nations in the multinational counter-terrorism task force.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Using global lessons learned, the Brits are re-inventing the large deck carrier.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY MARK WILLIS

NATO is intent on maintaining an active role in defending the security of its many member states.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY TIM LYNCH

Surprisingly, at a recent Foreign Policy conference, there was no specific reference to the role a military capability contributes to defining Canada’s position on the world stage.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

Are recent demonstrations of Russian military prowess just a façade?

(2015,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

Russia plans to focus on implementing the existing State Armaments Program for the period of 2011-2020, which was approved in 2011. The State Armaments Program involves massive purchases of combat equipment.

(2015,
issue 3)

Canadian, American and British Army soldiers sharpen their skills in a realistic, complex, and challenging operating environment during Exercise MAPLE RESOLVE. This year’s training, which ran from April 20 to May 23, is the largest and most complex effort to date. The various exercises are designed to test and validate the readiness of participating units to deploy to anywhere in the world.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY DAVID CARR

It has been ‘learn as you go’ for the U.S. Army and National Guard with the very versatile Airbus UH-72A Lakota. In March of this year, the first trainer-configured UH-72A helicopter for the U.S. Army rolled off the production line at Airbus Helicopters’ assembly plant in Columbus, Mississippi.

Defence Capability Leaders 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

Stoeger Canada is today part of the Beretta Holding Group. Controlled by the BERETTA family, the group encompasses key manufacturers of field and competition firearms and optics, as well as trading and distribution companies.

Defence Capability Facilitators 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is a federal Crown corporation mandated to facilitate international trade on behalf of Canadian industry, particularly within government markets.

A complex system of complex systems
(2015,
issue 2)
BY ALAIN BOVIS

The Canadian Surface Combatant project is steadily progressing towards choosing a platform designer and a Combat System Integrator. A modern warship is one of the most complex human-engineered systems on and there are many challenges involved in integrating such a complex system of increasingly complex systems.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

Upon arriving in Dnipropetrovsk at 6AM, our reporter was met by a team of Ukrainian army officers; their mismatched hand-me-down uniforms from western allies betrays the condition of the Ukrainian army facing modern Russian weapons.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

The tiny country of Djibouti, uniquely situated where the Africa, Arabia and Somalia tectonic plate boundaries meet, is becoming recognized as a strategic location for military efforts. French, US, and Japan’s armed forces, currently based in the area guarding the Bab-el-Mandeb Straight, are assigned missions on this triple front.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

After two decades of accepting American unipolarity, have Chinese leaders decided the relative balance of power, while not equal, has shifted significantly in its favour to the degree that the time to act is now?

(2015,
issue 2)
BY GEORGE PETROLEKAS

Casting the anti-ISIS mission as some sort of immoral misadventure, as it has by some, propagates a view that the world’s misfortunes are all the fault of the West and that liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality are inventions best kept to ourselves.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY GEORGE PETROLEKAS

A look at the allied strategies against this brutal group of killers.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

The Changing Nature of Power and Polarity in the International System

(2015,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Unexpected new deployments to Iraq created some imperatives that helped pave the way for new RAAF efficiencies.

(2015,
issue 1)

CBRNE defense, and especially preventive measures, are becoming much more internationally focused.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY FERRY DE KERCKHOVE

The CDA Institute calls for policy reviews for key political and economic areas: foreign, trade, aid, security, and defence.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence Procurement: it’s the Government’s duty to get things moving.

(2015,

Turkey has repeatedly said it shot down the Russian warplane on Tuesday only after the plane ignored several warnings and entered Turkish airspace, how will Putin respond? CNN video reports.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada’s air strikes are having the intended disruptive effect. The big question going forward is: will the peaceful Muslim community respond in unity against the so-called “Islamic State”?

(2014,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

What we have not considered, as a community of free thinkers, is that we have grossly underestimated the appeal and reach of jihadist propaganda to Canadians (and Americans) who feel any of the above stigmatizations or proclivities.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

The U.S. is simplifying how Canadian companies can export and re-export a broad range of aerospace- and defence-related hardware.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

China and Russia will be conducting naval exercises in the Pacific and Mediterranean in 2015. What does this latest development in their deepening relationship mean to the West?

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Land wars of the past decade have led to a significant redirection of military forces, particularly in the United States. Will this new focus help thwart and destroy ISIS? Can supporting the Kurdish military win against the “Islamic State” jihadists?

(2014,
issue 5)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Defining Canada’s Roles and Commitments.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ADAM P MACDONALD

Military dynamics in the East Asia region are changing as more states acquire capabilities that challenge America's military supremacy.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

Of the many flashpoints developing around the world, Russia and China are two simmering challenges. Are they going to erupt or stay the course?

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT J BUNKER

Examining implications of the action-reaction cycle of terror bombings.

(2014,
issue 5)

Illustrating determination around the world in dealing with such challenges, 15 nations collaborated during Exercise Rapid Trident to improve counter-terror tactics.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

I believe we are indeed willing to fight for our way of life (and clearly, inaction is not even remotely an option), but who are we fighting, and why?

(2014,
issue 4)
BY JEAN-MARC TANGUY

Today’s climate of unrest serves to highlight the value of cooperation between like-minded governments – and joint military exercises have always represented a keystone of such ties.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

The current situation in Eastern Europe reveals that the “Cold War” between democracy and communism has never truly been put to rest.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Sustaining reach is a key operational objective for effective air power.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

America-class amphibious assault ships incorporate a number of visionary innovations.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY ROBERT DAY

Were Western democracies naïve to Russian and Chinese agendas?

(2014,
issue 3)

The EU and Canada share the common goal of strengthening foreign and security cooperation.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

Christopher Bobyn details the development of the Crimean crisis from it's infancy as a demonstration of pro-EU demonstrations to the current level of a major international crisis which is raising the attention of the Eu and members of the G7 and in fact the world.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A recent RAAF-sponsored Air Power conference examined the evolving Aussie air combat approach.

Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi
(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Interview with Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi of Italy. Operations in the Arabian Gulf and Mediterranean Sea have brought Canadian and Italian navies into closer operational contact, and strengthened ties already forged within NATO.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Canada and other U.S. allies should monitor the sequestration situation, considering that its effects could again be “very damaging” to the American military.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Multiculturalism in the CF provides a clear advantage to the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) deployed to help the Philippines recover from Typhoon Haiyan.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The scope of products and technology subject to the CGRs would be significantly changed through proposed changes.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY PHILIP KUSCHE

Opportunities to train with so many other nations in tough terrain demostrates the value of RIMPAC exercises. 

Lt-Gen Deptula, USAF Deputy Chief of Staff: ISR
(2013,
issue 6)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Could the most significant post-Afghan development of unmanned vehicles be to shape cooperative relationships with indigenous forces in pursuit of shared counter-insurgency objective.

(2013,
issue 6)

Boeing updates its CF-18 legacy Hornet. The Super Hornet is set to challenge for Canada's new fighter jet requirement.

(2013,
issue 6)

Scientists work to improve methods of detecting and decon­taminating ricin.

(2013,
issue 6)

The ESA will fund a commercial internet gateway.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD, BY RICHARD BRAY

For maximum leverage in future acquisitions, Canada should find key opportunities in global supply chains.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

New cargo aircraft offer an intriguing mix of capacity, capability and range.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Troubling questions remain about quality control in the F-35 supply chain.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

For JSF pilots, increased situational awareness brings new combat options.

(2013,
issue 5)

South Korean officer cadets celebrate 50 years of diplomatic relations at CMR.

(2013,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Thinking back on the B-17 and commemorating the combat sacrifices of WWII's Mighty 8th.

(2013,
issue 4)

Looking into the present and future of Naval capabilities and technologies.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM

Is North Korea a serious threat or is the West distracted by ploys intended to impress North Korea's own populace?

(2013,
issue 3)

Advising the Afghan commander of the Training Centre in Kabul has its challenges, but definite progress is clearly visible.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

With French battleship Aquitaine on her shakedown cruise, the French Navy visits Halifax.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY BETHAN NODWELL

While the recklessness grows, the international community deliberates, talks, debates – but does little.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY ROBERT DAY

Increased criminal, commercial and naval activities along our western coast will influence Naval fleet considerations.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

While informed debate is beneficial to the democratic process, it is absolutely critical to progress and growth. Articles in this ­edition of FrontLine Defence prove once again the complexities of the defence world.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY BETHAN NODWELL

The CP-140 Aurora is arguably the most effective strategic C4ISR platform available.

Colonel Bernd Horn
(2013,
issue 2)
BY KEAN DOHERTY

An interview with the Chief of Staff, Strategic Training Education Programs, looks at the perceived value of educating our military.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY JEFFREY TRACEY

Former UNMOVIC Weapons Inspector looks back on the inspections, the evacuation, and the mandate.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

The program is steadily progressing. A look at the latest numbers. Are Canadian ­companies benefitting?

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ROBERT DAY

A number of false assumptions have led to foreseeable logistics failures.

General Charles Jacoby
(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

As the Arctic ice shrinks, the vulnerabilities grow. A conversation about Arctic strategy with Commander NORAD and NORTHCOM, U.S. General Charles Jacoby.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY JAMES FRYER

There are no bargains in a hostile sky. Alternative fighter jets could make Joint Strike Fighter look like a good deal.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY TIM DUNNE

Contrary to common belief, Canada punches above its weight in supporting NATO's efforts – it's time for Canada to shed its undeserved modesty.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

From troubled program to transformation reality, the Osprey has emerged to offer astoundingly flexible capabilities. Are new capabilities and proven frontline performance worth the price?

(2013,
issue 1)
BY SUNIL RAM

As terrorists and criminals converge, the analysis shows the challenge is shifting to law enforcement. But are we missing something? Terrorism in India represents a massive threat to democracy around the globe.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

While the planet heats up, defence budgets are melting down. Canadian defence planners need a sharper focus on a hotter Arctic.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY BLAIR WATSON

The NATO training missions in Afghanistan have seen a new enemy tactic – NATO trainers are being shot by insurgents who have infiltrated the ranks of ANA and ANP recruits.

(2012,
issue 5)

Visitors were treated to the latest in ­technological innovations, naval equipment and services, and of course, shipbuilding.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY ANDREW NELLESTYN

A new book commemorating Canadians who served in the Afghan mission is looking for personal stories.

(2012,
issue 5)

Despite Afghan corruption, U.S. troops track and account for aid supplies in Afghanistan.

LGen Markus Bentler, Commander
(2012,
issue 4)
BY JÜRGEN K.G. ROSENTHAL

The Response Forces Operations Command is the multinational and joint Bundeswehr command equipped to deploy anywhere in the world to ­exercise command and control of operations abroad.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

Is Canada's sovereignty vulnerable? The answer obviously depends on our level of political and financial commitment. How does the NSPS fit into this equation?

(2012,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

Is it time to chart a new path? Many questions must be considered when preparing for negotiations regarding future participation in NATO.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The first of 11 FREMM being built by DCNS.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY SUNIL RAM

As an ''intelligence asset'', Osama Bin Laden was allowed to live until...

(2012,
issue 1)
BY STEPHEN SADLER

Working with ISAF, NATO, EUPOL and the Canadian Embassy.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY RICHARD BRAY

MTTF handles all the assets accumulated in Kandahar over the years of our involvement in that country.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

HMCS Charlottetown quickly responded to Op Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

International cooperation ensured the success of Operation Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY PETER PIGOTT

A look at the aviation component of Operation Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY JULIAN KERR

DND continues to amass information on RPDE for a similar type of program in Canada. RPDE offers lessons learned for Canada's version: Project Accord.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

Defence Minister Peter MacKay hosted international leaders for discussions on key matters of global security.

(2011,
issue 6)

Rheinmetall is set to create a state-of-the-art Training Centre for the Russian Army.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Committees are often their own worst enemies when it comes to deciding which subjects to study. They often select issues based on current media profiles.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

Many of us wish we could turn the clock back 30 years to a simpler, safer time, but we cannot avoid the reality of the modern world.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Five Canadian fighter jets and 144 personnel policed the skies over Iceland.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS WITHINGTON

Canadian aerospace companies such as CMC Electronics, Bombardier, Magellan Aerospace and others were well represented at the biannual Paris Air Show.

Rear-Admiral Juan Guillermo Fierro Rocha
(2011,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

Mexican Navy deals with increasingly threats by transnational organized crime and subversive elements.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Since 1936, Canada’s military has trained thousands of non-pilot aircrew from nations on four continents.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY KEN POLE

A quick update on the recent U.S. announcement of changes.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY THOMAS WITHINGTON

The Canadian and French navies conduct navy-to-navy staff talks to improve interoperability.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY GILLES CHAMPOUX

Can Aboriginal toponymy be part of a solution to assert sovereignty in the Canadian Arctic?

(2011,
issue 1)

An interesting mix of Canadians celebrate Christmas with the troops.

(2011,
issue 1)

Personnel from many government departments are working in Kandahar to mentor and train Afghans as they transition.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY

What does the future hold for defence funding and procurement?

(2011,
issue 1)

Canada’s first J-model Hercs arrived at Kandahar Airfield on 1 January 2011. It will be used for intra-theatre transport of troops and cargo, battlefield illumination, and cargo drops.

(2010,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

One of the most important decisions facing governments of “the west” is how to handle the dangerous unrest in the middle east, particularly Afghanistan.

(2010,
issue 6)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Today’s Afghanistan is the product of ­generations of epic struggles, historical ironies, and a myriad of successes and ­failures – military and other.

(2010,
issue 6)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Serious problems were raised at NATO’s Parliamentary Assembly.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON

An assessment of politics and corruption in Afghanistan politics.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY KEN POLE

The challenge for the federal government is balancing the need for security against industry’s need to do business.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

With determined leadership, Canada’s strong and battle-hardened army has risen from the Decade of Darkness to stand internationally as an army of example.

(2010,
issue 2)

Is training people to control Small Arms and Light Weapons a good idea? What are the practical difficulties in such efforts?

(2010,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

In many ways, ITARs backfired on U.S. companies. A review by the Obama administration is set to eliminate ­unnecessary obstacles on both ends of the ITAR supply chain.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY

Synopsis of defence equipment plans around the world.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY JAMES CARELESS

Mexico’s military is embroiled in a civil war with the country’s drug cartels. It’s an battle with no apparent end in sight, and in which the very reason for bringing troops into the fray may well be their undoing.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY SUNIL RAM

It seems America has forgotten both the lessons of Vietnam and the Soviet experience in Afghanistan, and has fallen back on stupid and arrogant ideas that are simply a rehash of failed tactics and strategies of yesteryear.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Canada is pulling together in massive government response. Army, Navy, Air Force, the DART, CIDA, Foreign Affairs... all working feverishly to help Haitians in this hour of need.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

Practice, practice, practice – this is what saves lives in the army. As 1 RCR Battle Group prepares for deployment to Afghanistan, practice is what they get at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center in the Mojave Desert.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Hudson reviews and reports on the effectiveness of House of Commons and Senate proceedings and committees.

(2009,
issue 6)

DCNS; WiDS; Lockheed Martin.

(2009,
issue 5)
BY JAMES CARELESS

With no tangible military threats to worry about, the impetus behind foreign missions is to use military resources to do humanitarian and political good, plus provide support to Australia and other western allies.

(2009,
issue 5)

As Chief of the Defence Staff, I have said that the defence of Canada begins off shore in places like Afghanistan.

(2009,
issue 5)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our work is yet to be completed. We should clearly define the conditions of any disengagement we seek.

(2009,
issue 5)

Newfoundland and Labrador have been actively pursuing opportunities to design, develop and test leading-edge technologies in the UVS sector.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY JAMES CARELESS

The Russian military is one of the largest military establishments in the world today, but in dire need of modernization and social reform.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

The history of Afghanistan must be taken into account in any peace planning.

(2009,
issue 3)

BAE Systems; OSI Geospacial Inc; Raytheon Company; and Ultra Electronics.

(2009,
issue 3)

Author Scott Taylor chooses the more controversial ‘path less travelled.’

(2009,
issue 3)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

Uncovering the differences between the perceived (peaceful and reconciliatory) and the actual (tense and aggressive) situation in Kosovo of today.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

Since his recent return from Afghanistan as Commander, Brigadier-General Denis W. Thompson has been taking his message to Canadians during a cross-Canada speaking tour.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY TIM DUNNE

Noted specialists on Afghan affairs, Dr. David Kilcullen and J. Alexander Thier, tackle concerns about allied ­military operations in Afghanistan.

(2009,
issue 1)

What challenges does a woman in a position of authority face while working with locals in Afghanistan?

(2009,
issue 1)
BY JOANNA CALDER

 An overview of mission support in Afghanistan – from 2001 to present day.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Leadership needed for marine security.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Will Canada Command play a key role?

(2008,
issue 4)

Reserve issues have generated much discussion over the years.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

In a theatre of war, soldiers, sailors, airmen and air women are required to function in a volatile and relentlessly unforgiving environment. Evidence shows the mission is beginning to take a growing physical and psychological toll.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY JÜRGEN K.G. ROSENTHAL

Today’s operational reality dictates increasingly demanding roles for armoured vehicles and their crews.

(2008,
issue 4)

Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan mentors help the Afghan National Police prepare for success.

(2008,
issue 3)

Canada’s deployment with SNMG1 was remarkably successful on many levels.

General Egon Ramms
(2008,
issue 3)
BY JÜRGEN K.G. ROSENTHAL

General Egon Ramms, German Army Commander of Allied Joint Force ­Command Brunssum.

(2008,
issue 2)

Confronting issues of extremism in a ­primarily military manner is a mistake.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Is this the Avro Arrow spelled backward? What does the sale of national security assets mean for Canada’s Foreign Policy?

(2007,
issue 6)
BY KRIS HATASHITA

Civilians seldom get an opportunity to experience an FOB (Forward Op­er­ating Base) quite the way Kris did. Setting out from HQ (Director, Land Com­mand Systems Program Manage­ment) on a technical assistance visit, he now has a new perspective on the value of his work back home.

(2007,
issue 6)
BY BERNIE GROVER

The general consensus maintains that Canada’s defence procurement system is not meeting the expectations of the any of the key stakeholders. And allegations of improprieties continue to plague the system.

Rear-Admiral Witthauer
(2007,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Commanding EUFOR in Bosnia since December 2006, RAdm Witthauer of Germany has direct command over 2500 troops stationed there. There is tremendous opportunity for development at many ­levels in the Balkans, and EUFOR is helping the people stay on track with their aim of lasting peace and in progressing towards integration in the European Union.

(2007,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Peace is taking hold at last in Bosnia – transitioning with Canadian help.

(2007,
issue 5)
BY GREG WESTFALL

Canada invests heavily in R&D to ensure that its radar technology remains at the cutting edge.

(2007,
issue 5)

Combat conditions challenge the soldiers calling for and the pilots bringing in the close air support. Through demonstrations designed to fuse various nations’ operating procedures and technologies, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are determined to reduce blue-on-blue incidents.

(2007,
issue 4)

Prevention, cooperation, & integration provide effective threat solutions.

Capt(N) Victor Nikitin
(2007,
issue 4)

An interview with Capt(N) Nikitin, Russia's Defence Attache.

(2007,
issue 4)

RAN looks to the future for long-term solutions.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY SIR JACK DEVERELL

It is self-evident that members of an armed force must be extremely disciplined. Commitment and education levels of today's recruits have been called into question, however, as have their willingness to put up with adversity, their lack of deference and their physical and mental robustness. Will leaders be able to effectively harness the raw independence of today's youth?

(2007,
issue 2)
BY SUNIL RAM

One of the most poorly understood world figures today.

(2007,
issue 2)

The Mistral-class LHD-LPD vessel.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY TIM PAGE

To effectively maximize taxpayer return on military procurements through strategic industrial benefits, Canada must first remove impediments from the IRB guidelines.

(2007,
issue 1)

Better utilization of the Canadian IRB Program can be achieved through addressing program requirements earlier.

(2006,
issue 6)

For Canada’s Air Force, the ability to stay relevant while balancing limited resources with changing demands is a question of survival. Operating in a continually changing world, the Air Force performs a myriad of challenging activities that contribute to national and international security.

(2006,
issue 6)

On 1 November 2006, Canada turned over the command of NATO troops in southern Afghanistan to the Netherlands. Dutch General Ton van Loon has taken over from Canadian General David Fraser, and has roughly 9,800 British, American, Canadian and Dutch troops serving under him in southern Afghanistan.

(2006,
issue 6)

There has been much discussion of late with regards to the various “caveats” which restrict the ability of some nations to assist their coalition partners during times of need. Poland has agreed to lift its caveats on the use of its contingent. Also, the Polish Minister of National Defence, Radek Sikorski, announced that Poland would send an additional 1,000 troops to assist NATO’s ISAF force in Afghanistan by February 2007.

(2006,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada/U.S. conference promotes integration of North American defence & security industrial base. With a heightened global instability and a shared concern for domestic security, the time is right for Canada and the United States to revitalize the bilateral co-operation that has historically existed between Canadian and U.S. defence and security industries.

(2006,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The F-35 JSF programme migrated from the development phase to actual aircraft production on June 20, 2006. The four major subassemblies for the first aircraft were joined at Lockheed Martin facilities in Fort Worth, Texas – and manufacturing of parts for the second aircraft got underway. A total of 15 flight-test aircraft are to be built with the first scheduled lift off by November 2006.

(2006,
issue 5)
BY PAUL MANSON

Opposition party’s remarkably myopic vision of what is really going on in Afghanistan, disregards the consequences of such a misguided policy. Canada cannot betray her allies by giving up in the effort to create the stability required in order for reconstruction to proceed. Any assumption that the Taliban could be encouraged to sit at the negotiating table is pure nonsense.

(2006,
issue 4)

Recent attacks in Afghanistan have prompted a flurry of international reporting that suggests that stability in this war-ravaged country remains illusive. While this coverage is understandable, it does not show is the progress that is being made…

(2006,
issue 4)

You can be certain of one fact: The Afghans do not want to turn the clock back to once again live under the spell of a fanatic, repressive and misogynist regime that has deviated from mainstream, moderate Islamic and Afghan cultural norms…

(2006,
issue 4)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Poor governance, weak institutions, insurgency, regional warlords and poverty – Afghanistan has all of these, in abundance. Deep in sometimes hostile territory, these forts housing the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) are perhaps Afghanistan’s best hope for the future…

(2006,
issue 3)
BY DWIGHT N. MASON

The U.S. and Canada have agreed to renew the NORAD Agreement that provides binational air defense control and space warning. This latest renewal adds an ­important new feature.

Future Forces
(2006,
issue 2)
BY ANGIE MORGAN

Many have argued that women should not serve in the military. Today every troop is asked to work harder and smarter. In a climate where the operational tempo is extremely high, imagine if our governments were to suddenly direct all women in the military to stand down from service and resign from the military…

Future Forces / International
(2006,
issue 2)
BY WARREN KING

An example of a major ongoing activity which lends itself to the support of the CF Transformation is the Joint Simulation and Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, Training and Support (JSMARTS) series of exercises.

Future Forces / International
(2006,
issue 2)
BY ÅSA LINDESTAM

The Swedish Armed Forces are currently undergoing a period of major change – transforming into a smaller, but more active, operational defense force…

(2006,
issue 2)
BY LEWIS MacKENZIE

A rash of attacks against our soldiers in Afghanistan have raised the profile of Canada’s mission in that country and stimulated an overdue debate regarding our role there. Perhaps it is timely to remind Canadians, the media, and the politicians, of what constitutes a peacekeeping mission.

Gen Rick Hillier
(2006,
issue 2)
BY RICK HILLIER

General Hillier explains his understanding of why Canada has agreed to help Afghan government authorities establish a secure environment and aid in governance and reconstruction.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JAMES COX

Many in the defence industry community have taken DND to task over the department’s intention to fast-track new  tactical airlift for the Canadian Forces.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The politicization of Canada’s Defence procurement process continued with the recent announcement of a $4.6 billion plan for 16 new aircraft to replace Canada’s fleet of old C-130 Hercules tactical transports just on the eve of the federal election. 

(2006,
issue 1)

Canada’s armed forces are transforming. As outlined in the 2005 Defence Policy Statement, the transformation centres on encouraging innovation, promoting efficiency, and above all, on instigating a “fundamental change in military culture.” 

(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Over the years, various procedures have been followed when purchasing military ­equipment, from long and costly procedures to replace the Sea King helicopters, to the purchase of 16 tactical aircraft at a cost of close to $5 billion.

(2005,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In Brief

(2005,
issue 6)

Many attempts have been made by people within the military, public service and private citizens to change the way explosives are governed in this country. Where does the resistance come from? Could it be that those who could rectify the situation are unaware of the problem?

(2005,
issue 6)

As military professionals, we have a duty to ensure that our soldiers are well equipped, in every sense of the word, to meet the challenge of terrorism.

(2005,
issue 6)
BY JOE VARNER

Al Qaeda has long had a fascination with maritime targets and has a history of going after these interests with only limited success.

(2005,
issue 6)

On the front lines against the Taliban and Al-Qaeda a new threat is emerging which could potentially undermine the excellent work accomplished thus far.

(2005,
issue 6)

While many are aware that military police patrol bases and Department of National Defence (DND) property across the country, most are not familiar with the extensive support services behind these frontline-policing activities.

(2005,
issue 6)

The terrorist actions of September 11, 2001, and subsequent tragedies such as the Madrid and London bombings, have highlighted the threat to our public safety, national security, and our economic security.

(2005,
issue 5)

Colonel Steve Bowes assumed responsibility of the Kandahar Provincial Recon­struction Team from the Americans in a Transfer of Authority ceremony. Members moved from Kabul to Kandahar to take part in Operation Archer.

(2005,
issue 5)

Britain and the Royal Navy celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar with a number of events, including the International Fleet Review, as part of SeaBritain 2005 honouring Britain’s maritime heritage. 

(2005,
issue 5)

Canada’s area of responsibility for SAR covers over 15.5 million square kilometres, of which over 60% is above the tree line. Given those facts, training for arctic rescue is critical to ensure an appropriate response to distresses in that region. Arctic SAREX is a testament to the Canadian Forces’ dedication that others may live.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

The most ambitious, Canadian-led, multinational, naval-air exercise of its kind since the mid-1990s Exercise Trident Fury is providing an excellent opportunity to assess the state of Canada’s Navy and interoperability with the U.S. Navy.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY JERROD RILEY

''The little ship that could'' is enjoying a renaissance in the global naval community. Will corvettes brave the North Atlantic once again?

The European Option:
(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is a growing demand for military transport aircraft. The world’s Air Forces will take delivery of 922 new transports valued at US$53 billion. FrontLine reviews three aircraft that could handle the CF requirements: Lockheed C-130J, Boeing C-17, and the Airbus A400M.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The latest model is the C-130J, and it represents a nearly complete reinvention of the Hercules.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is a growing demand for military transport aircraft. The world's Air Forces will take delivery of 922 new transports valued at US$53 billion. FrontLine reviews three aircrafts that could handle the CF requirements: Lockheed C-130J, Boeing C-17, and the Airbus A400M.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY JAMES SIMIANA

Throughout much of 2004, Sudan, and in particular its western Darfur region, was the humanitarian crisis news story. It remains so today, largely because of the scale of human disaster and atrocities committed there, as well as the intractable nature of that regional conflict.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY LEWIS MacKENZIE

Numerous times during the past four years, Canadians were promised a Defence White Paper which would follow and respond to an updated Foreign Policy review.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY ANGUS BROWN

Canada’s Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) has now returned, and its personnel have dispersed to their respective units. Another chapter in CF humanitarian operations has ended and statistics are flowing from the NDHQ Public Affairs desks to anyone who wants to listen to the usefulness and success of the DART deployment.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY SUNIL RAM

The buzzword across NATO and the US military is “Transformation.” Under the leadership of General Rick Hillier the Canadian Forces (CF) is in the process of prosecuting the transformation vision.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY STAN JACOBSON

Training supports the ­”ultimate” activity, which is cost-effective, timely and accurate on-the-job performance. Individuals in the training pipeline (instructors, students, or support staff), are not performing operational tasks.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT FLUKINGER, BY CHRIS BOUQUET

The USA will spend an estimated US $7.6 billion on biodefense measures in 2005, and they want Canadian companies to join the search for solutions.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Airbus Military’s A400M

(2005,
issue 1)
BY RONALD COVAIS

It’s all about Leadership, at all levels, across disciplines ...

(2005,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

The military uses of unmanned (uninhabited!) vehicles have increased dramatically in the last few years.

(2005,
issue 1)
BY DUANE CRONIN

The development of improved protection from Anti-personnel landmines has been an area of international interest since the Second World War.

(2005,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS

The Canadian Government embarks on the review of the Bill C-36.

(2005,
issue 1)
BY JAMES COX

Canada is not doing enough, fast enough.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JEAN JACQUES BLAIS

It's unfortunate that the subject of military spending is almost always precipitated by a tragic incident within our armed forces or their inability to respond when needed. This latest tragedy should be a wake up call that we need to seriously examine how we equip our military to represent our nation to the world.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

We require the preparation of a realistic defence policy and program that will both demonstrate our intention to protect our sovereignty, our people and our resources and our intention to fulfill our role as a meaningful action on the international scene.

Stan Jacobson
(2004,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada's defence industry is struggling to find ways to mitigate some aspects of the ITAR policy and the way it is administered. The CDIA has some recommendations which may help.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS WATTIE

The Department of National Defence has a $3-billion plan to upgrade its frigates. Bu the mid-life refit and modernizations has been pushed back by funding shortfalls to the point where the oldest vessels of the class are not scheduled to begin their nine-month facelift until 2011.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JOHN LEECH

FrontLine had the opportunity to chat with the Commandant about the Atlantic Littoral ISR Experiment (ALIX), the largest major undertaking in the ongoing CFEC program.

German Bundeswehr
(2004,
issue 5)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Reduced post Cold War threat, budget reductions, and regional conflicts are driving factors behind the restructuring of the Bundeswehr (Military) from a large Mechanized force, structured to repel armoured attacks by Warsaw Pact forces, to lighter, rapidly deployable units suited for UN missions and Peace Support Ops.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JOSHUA KILBERG

A roundtable discussion on how NATO is addressing terrorism and WMD concerns.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY ANIL R. PUSTAM

Operation Iraqi Freedom, while not a model for future conflict, still ­provides pointers to how far the US has progressed along the path to fielding capabilities that are increasingly important in the emerging American way of war.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

FrontLine has compiled a tightly edited summation of excerpts from the Minister's speech at the Toronto conference.

MGen Andrew Leslie
(2004,
issue 4)
BY JAMES COX

Returning from his Kabul posting as Deputy Commander of ISAF, MGen Leslie remains convinced of the need for more soldiers and modernized equipment. In an exclusive FrontLine interview, he offers his insight of time spent in Kabul, and makes a surprising suggestion for increased efficiency. 

(2004,
issue 4)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

The recent efforts of the Canadian Navy in the Global War against Terrorism in the Arabian Sea.

(2004,
issue 4)

Intelligence-gathering and operating agencies do not like to share.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Take a look back.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY INGAR MOEN, BY HAROLD STOCKER

The Legal & Ethical Debate Rages On

(2004,
issue 3)
BY BERNARD BOT

To safeguard international peace and security, the multilateral system will have to find an effective response. Whatever their difference, the United States and Europe should maintain a united front in the face of tomorrow's challenges.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY GEORGE KEARNEY

The Government of Canada announces a National Security Policy (NSP) for Canada entitled Securing an Open Society: Canada’s National Security Policy.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

It has been the fullest two years of Canadian naval activity since the end of the Korean War, and the lessons are legion.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS WATTIE

In a far corner of sprawling Camp Julien, a group of eight reporters set up shot - the first journalists to be formally "embedded" with a Canadian Forces unit in the field. Members of the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment battlegroup in Kabul were on the sharp end of a quiet public relations offensive by the Canadian Forces.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY ALAN BREAKSPEAR

The war on terror has brought with it a new awareness of the business of intelligence.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM

Given the troubled times we live in, with a war with Iraq raging, nuclear threats from North Korea, and terrorists behind every corner, it is imperative that there be open dialogue between the military and the media in Canada.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY INGAR MOEN

The Defence R&D Canada Tiger Team Analysis of Transformation Implications tackled this challenge in its technical report, Transformation Concepts and Technologies.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY JAMES COX

What happened to the National Security Policy (NSP) during the federal election campaign?

(2004,
issue 2)

An overview of Findland's safety and defence technologies and concepts. 

(2004,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Budget 2004 has yet-again ignored DND’s desire for an integral Strategic Airlift capability.

Interview: General Ray Henault
(2004,
issue 2)
BY JOHN LEECH

The Canadian Forces responds to the changing security environment.

(2004,
issue 2)

Multinational flying packages which are becoming common in ­military operations today. The NFTC offers participating air forces a three-phase training programme for their future fighter pilots using state-of-art software and equipment.

Maritime Security
(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

Traditionally, we have been a nation that “reacts” to crises, but Canada has a part to play in this international Security and Intelligence transformation.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The current state of Canada's air mobility fleet is an area of concern. The renewal of our air-to-air refuelling role will greatly enhance the contribution that our air mobility and fighter forces can make in the implementation of the Government’s foreign and domestic policy goals.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY INGAR MOEN

A key concept for military transformation and future ops of the new security ­environment.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The C-295 as a cost-effective means of securing borders and protecting resources. The basic design has been improved to make it a multi-role aircraft, such as for transport of freight, medevac and ­paratroops.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Welcome to the new FrontLine. This new magazine brings together many well-known writers and industry experts to offer another voice on the defence and enforcement scene. With the Canadian public becoming more and more aware of the issues and challenges in this sector, we certainly believe there is a need for this new publication.

FrontLine Notebook
(2004,
issue 1)

General Atomics Aero­nautical Systems, Inc., was awarded a Canadian Forces contract to deploy its ALTAIR unmanned aircraft, a Predator B variant, in support of the Atlantic Littoral Intelligence, Surveillance, Recon­naissance Experiment (ALIX).

(2004,
issue 1)
BY ED STOREY

Recovering Canadian artifacts.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY TREVOR COLE

An update to the Contractor Support Program which began operation in September 2000 at Canadian bases in Bosnia... three years later, the program has transformed into CANCAP, the Canadian Contractor Augmentation Program, which hit Bosnia on September 14, 2003.

Protecting Canadian Sovereignty and Contributing to Global Stability
(2004,
issue 1)
BY STEPHEN HARPER

With unrealized potential as one of the world's leading nations, Canada requires a defence strategy that can better project our military forces globally, while simultaneously increasing our continental efforts to defend North America.

Admiral Ishikawa, Chairman of the Joint Staff Councils
(2004,
issue 1)
BY B.R. BROWN

Before his recent retirement as Canada’s Defence Attaché in Japan, Capt(N) B.R. Brown interviewed the Chairman of Japan’s Joint Staff Council, Admiral Ishikawa, about his plan of action.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY DON SISSON

Memories of the horrific treatment of Allied veterans by Eastern Block communist nations after the Second World War.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is widespread consensus that NATO must change, that it must modernize and transform into a rapidly deployable force able to operate anywhere at a moment’s notice.

(2004,
issue 1)
BY DAVE BROWN

In almost 40 years in journalism I've interviewed hundreds of veterans who have put in time at the point of the wartime spear and I marvel at their ability to have survived the experience and still appear normal.

Unmanned Vehicles Take Off – Again
(2004,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

Thanks to the timely work of a new association called UVS Canada and their first major conference, "Momentum 2003," held recently in Ottawa, there is now a focus and a platform for the kind of collaboration necessary to start exploring this potential.