CATEGORIES

(2019,
issue 3)

The Royal Canadian Navy’s “Canadian Leaders at Sea” is a unique recruiting tool. We need to make sure that our youth know of the opportunities and possibilities that await onboard Canadian ships.

(2018,
issue 6)

Submarine Force has had a busy year in 2018 – in particular, it two highly successful, simultaneous, out-of-area deployments.

(2018,
issue 6)

Alongside the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Navy is forging ahead with full spectrum targeting to allow seamless interoperability across the Canadian Armed Forces as well as with allies for future operations.

(2018,
issue 3)

Does Project Resolve represent a catch-all solution for future procurement? Not likely; but it does highlight how innovative and less-restrictive processes can circumvent the inertia that has been crippling defence procurement.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY DAVID BERCUSON

While some nations work at putting conflict behind them, others work harder to achieve global dominance.

(2018,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

After VAdm Mark Norman’s request for financial assistance was rejected by DND (which had somehow decided the vice-admiral was guilty before being charged), supporters have stepped up to help pay legal fees for his defence. An overview of the situation that brought Canada's highly respected Vice-Chief to the courthouse.

Canadian Surface Combatant
(2017,
issue 5)
BY STEVE ZUBER

Preparing for threats of next four decades will require next generation technologies and that includes the Infrared Search and Track system.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Adapting to anti-submarine warfare (ASW) requires mastering new technologies that provide capabilities to leverage reachback systems, robust networks, and distributed strike options.

Safety at Sea
(2017,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The history of marine safety legislation and standards are built on a solid foundation past incidents. Learning from them is an important element of risk management.

(2017,
issue 3)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
A bold call for recapitalization & modernization

A bold call for expediting platform replacement and modernization.

(2017,
issue 3)
What is it for?

For at least a decade, China has been developing naval assets, not simply for the defence of its coastal waters, but to project power into the region. 

(2017,
issue 2)

It’s safe to say the Canadian Patrol Frigate Program is the largest Defence project completed in Canada to date. We look at key factors that contributed to successful delivery of 12 Patrol Frigates for the RCN.

(2017,
issue 1)

Numerous new programs have been created to offer a wide variety of benefits to serving and veteran members.

Maritime Tactical Operations Group
(2016,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

A new tactical requirement to patrol and protect maritime trade routes has created a resurgence of vessel boardings and searches.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Industry and government representatives from around the world gathered to learn about new naval technologies and concepts. 

(2016,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

A look at Australia’s final choice to build a new class of advanced-­capability diesel/electric-powered submarines. Innovative collaboration is changing the way major procurements are benefitting both buyer and seller.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY TIM McDERMOTT

As Canada seeks to redefine its role in world affairs, perhaps it’s time to look at new alternatives to the way Canada can respond in the humanitarian role.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

There is a reason the Royal Canadian Navy’s submarine HMCS Windsor and her three sisters, Victoria, Corner Brook and Chicoutimi, carry the imposing moniker of hunter-killer submarines (SSK).

(2016,
issue 4)

Determined to avoid the ad hoc way in which pieces of a larger system of ­systems are too often selected, the RCN has completed work that will guide a holistic acquisition approach to MUxS.

(2016,
issue 3)

The RCN has identified a clear need for new boats with tactical capabilities, here's why.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Does the name change to the National Shipbuilding Strategy signal a shift from the “longer timeframe for less capability and more cost” scenario the NSPS is being criticized for?

National Interests
(2016,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Do Canadians know how vulnerable the submarine fiber-optic cables are, and should we protect this critical infrastructure?

(2016,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Leaders think in terms of logistics, but the operational enablers often fall victim to pointy-end procurement programs.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

A clear illustration of how the NSPS for CSC has gone overboard in complexity, lacks transparency, and involves a process that puts contenders’ IP at risk.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY RON BUCK

Does Canada need to retain this capability, and how many ships do we really need?

(2016,
issue 1)
BY FRONTLINE

Defence industry notes and DND appointments.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

The need to defend Canada always leads to a discussion of submarines. Now, climate change gives more credence to the need for nuclear-powered submarines.

(2015,
issue 6)

An in-depth update of the NSPS, particularly as it relates to Canada's new Surface Combatants program.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Based on Prime Minister Trudeau’s clear mandates to his new Cabinet ministers, the government is clearly ready to think outside the box when it comes to Defence Procurement.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The 21st century has been called a maritime century, but Canadians don’t see themselves as a maritime nation. Many factors impact the existing and future maritime capability, and can often have unforeseen consequences.

Commander Peter Bergen Henegouwen (Royal Netherlands Navy)
(2015,
issue 5)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE

Standing NATO Mine Counter-Measures Group One (SNMCMG 1) contributes to keeping sea trade safe and open.

National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy
(2015,
issue 4)

With the release of the RFRE, the CSC procurement process has begun to move. FrontLine looks at Warship Designers that are potential contenders for the lucrative contract.

Commodore Brian Santarpia
(2015,
issue 4)
BY TIM DUNNE

From the Combined Task Force (CTF) 150 headquarters in Bahrain, Commodore Brian Santarpia commanded the ships and aircraft of 30 nations in the multinational counter-terrorism task force.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Using global lessons learned, the Brits are re-inventing the large deck carrier.

(2015,
issue 4)

The power of sport and camaraderie can rekindle a joie de vivre in PTSD sufferers

(2015,
issue 3)

The $35B National Ship Procurement Strategy (NSPS) was first announced in June 2010 following several failed high profile procurement projects – notably the Joint Support Ship (JSS) in 2008, and perceived challenges in delivering a successful Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project. Initiated with great optimism, FrontLine looks at its progression so far.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY DAVID CARR

It has been ‘learn as you go’ for the U.S. Army and National Guard with the very versatile Airbus UH-72A Lakota. In March of this year, the first trainer-configured UH-72A helicopter for the U.S. Army rolled off the production line at Airbus Helicopters’ assembly plant in Columbus, Mississippi.

Defence Capability Leaders 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

DCNS is a French industrial group specialised in naval defence and energy.

Defence Capability Leaders 2015
(2015,
issue 3)

Fleetway offers a comprehensive capability in engineering, technical and management services.

Rear-Admiral John Newton
(2015,
issue 2)

The Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and Joint Force Command Atlantic talks to FrontLine about his priorities.

A complex system of complex systems
(2015,
issue 2)
BY ALAIN BOVIS

The Canadian Surface Combatant project is steadily progressing towards choosing a platform designer and a Combat System Integrator. A modern warship is one of the most complex human-engineered systems on and there are many challenges involved in integrating such a complex system of increasingly complex systems.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The current Chief of U.S. Naval Operations, Admiral Jonathan Greenert, has focused considerable attention on digital operations in the re-set of the U.S. Navy and its approach to 21st century operations. From electronic warfare, to digital interoperability, to integrated fire support and cyber security, the Admiral has underscored that mastering the digital domain is an essential warfighting competence.

VAdm Mark Norman
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Getting many new ship builds underway through cooperation with key government departments, ­managing operations with reduced fleets, finding innovative ways to train enough new recruits, and the daunting task of overhauling navy culture, are all key priorities on the Admiral’s plate.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Today, the future of Canada’s submarine service is in doubt. Key experts challenge the topic.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

VAdm Mark Norman discusses the state of the Naval fleets.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY TIM DUNNE

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy is aimed at to rejuvenating Canada's ­shipbuilding industry by reversing its headlong thrust into irrelevance.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

International shipping issues will become more central to Canada’s economic decisions and future trade policy, and the RCN plays a big part in Maritime security.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Land wars of the past decade have led to a significant redirection of military forces, particularly in the United States. Will this new focus help thwart and destroy ISIS? Can supporting the Kurdish military win against the “Islamic State” jihadists?

(2014,
issue 5)
BY LEE CARSON

Press coverage has generated new awareness of Canada’s Arctic, but what does it mean for Canada?

(2014,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Watching as Canada struggles to maintain a Naval fleet that is ­commensurate with its efforts to be influential in global affairs.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY IAN PARKER

Canada's military focus has changed from strategic to tactical thinking.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY PETER CAIRNS

A look at the tumultuous issues related to used submarines, with an eye on the future security of Canada.

(2014,
issue 4)

The role of CJOC combines the responsibilities of three Commands into a single organization.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY JEAN-MARC TANGUY

Today’s climate of unrest serves to highlight the value of cooperation between like-minded governments – and joint military exercises have always represented a keystone of such ties.

(2014,
issue 4)

Canada's commitment to the war effort was a whole-of-country response.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

The current situation in Eastern Europe reveals that the “Cold War” between democracy and communism has never truly been put to rest.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

America-class amphibious assault ships incorporate a number of visionary innovations.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

The French frigate replacement program has strong similarities to key aspects of Canada's CSC program.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY JAMES PARKER

A look at options for replacing auxiliary oiler replenishment ships.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

The vastness of the Pacific region exemplifies the need for, and amplifies the challenges of cooperation.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY ROBERT DAY

Ensuring sufficient experienced project management staff are in place is the first step in returning to efficiency.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY NORMAN JOLIN

Does Canada need to incorporate submarine capability to its surveillance and sovereignty requirements?

(2014,
issue 2)

New programming initiatives such as ­emergency preparedness workshops and meeting spaces generate renewed interest in the emergency government headquarters.

Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi
(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Interview with Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi of Italy. Operations in the Arabian Gulf and Mediterranean Sea have brought Canadian and Italian navies into closer operational contact, and strengthened ties already forged within NATO.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

A decade of painfully public, thoroughly documented delays and renegotiations has taken the procurement beyond an embarrassment to a political liability.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

A National Crisis. The level of concern about mental health in the Canadian Forces has spiked with recent tragic losses.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Multiculturalism in the CF provides a clear advantage to the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) deployed to help the Philippines recover from Typhoon Haiyan.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY PHILIP KUSCHE

Opportunities to train with so many other nations in tough terrain demostrates the value of RIMPAC exercises. 

(2013,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Deliberations on optional budget reductions must examine some sacred cows that have escaped scrutiny, largely because of ignorance, apathy or cowardice. Consider these gutsy ideas when cutting the defence budget.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

A robust Marine Domain Awareness (MDA) capability must be developed as an element of Canada’s northern strategy.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Robotic vehicles can be a critically important tool for protection of sovereignty infrastructure in Canada’s Arctic and ocean spaces.

(2013,
issue 6)

Boeing updates its CF-18 legacy Hornet. The Super Hornet is set to challenge for Canada's new fighter jet requirement.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

How Canada builds new destroyers could determine success or failure of National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Troubling questions remain about quality control in the F-35 supply chain.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY TIM DUNNE

With new ships on the horizon, Mari-Tech 2013 marine technical conference was the right place at the right time.

(2013,
issue 5)

South Korean officer cadets celebrate 50 years of diplomatic relations at CMR.

VAdm Mark Norman
(2013,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The new Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, has taken the wheel during a time of renewed fiscal restraint. How will these priorities affect readiness throughout the fleet?

(2013,
issue 4)
BY IAN PARKER

For five years, the defence community has looked to the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) for direction. Today, in a greatly changed world, it may be time to change the CFDS as well.

(2013,
issue 4)

Combating PTSD: Military veterans and their options.

(2013,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

After a decade of combat in Afghanistan, some Canadian veterans who suffered psychological injuries are still fighting to get the help they need to recover.

(2013,
issue 4)

Looking into the present and future of Naval capabilities and technologies.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

With French battleship Aquitaine on her shakedown cruise, the French Navy visits Halifax.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY ROBERT DAY

Increased criminal, commercial and naval activities along our western coast will influence Naval fleet considerations.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY IAN PARKER

Will Mahans’ advice to ''build a strong navy” be evident in the NSPS roll-out?

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

The government has abdicated its role as procurement authority and allowed the shipyards to determine who is entitled to the billions of taxpayer’s money.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY JAMES PARKER

Would multi-purpose vessels be more cost-effective than an Icebreaker and Patrol Ships?

(2013,
issue 1)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

From troubled program to transformation reality, the Osprey has emerged to offer astoundingly flexible capabilities. Are new capabilities and proven frontline performance worth the price?

(2013,
issue 1)
BY GREGORY C.P. MATTE

Helmets to Hardhats Canada provides construction industry opportunities for members of the Canadian Forces.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Navy brass get that sinking feeling. A revised Canada First Defence Strategy could leave the Royal Canadian Navy with a smaller, less capable fleet.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY TIM DUNNE

The world’s oceans are anything but peaceful, in fact, the seas are more like “the wild west'' these days.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Canada has no defence policy and members of parliament seem disinterested in that fact. The CFDS is out of date, unaffordable and impotent.

(2012,
issue 5)

Visitors were treated to the latest in ­technological innovations, naval equipment and services, and of course, shipbuilding.

(2012,
issue 5)

Airbus Military, Boeing, CAE, DCNS, DRS Technologies, Lockheed Martin, MDA, Northrop Grumman, Pelican Products, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Rheinmetall, Textron, Viking Air.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

With this great summer weather, one might expect FrontLine’s editorial lineup to be on the light side. We have instead, some serious summer reading on many aspects of defence procurement.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

While parliamentarians enjoy their summer break, they might spend some time thinking about how they can do a better job of holding government to account. Perhaps a bit of summertime reading would remind them of what needs to be done.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

This spring, senior Canadian military leaders were again talking about the need for a dedicated amphibious ship.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

Is Canada's sovereignty vulnerable? The answer obviously depends on our level of political and financial commitment. How does the NSPS fit into this equation?

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD ARCHER

A pro-maritime, pro-Navy policy and sustained focus on boosting its sea power would increase Canada's engagement and influence in the world.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Selecting a naval engine is a series of compromises between categories like speed, cost, power, survivability, fuel efficiency and range.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY TIM LYNCH

Today’s global maritime order is based on delicate legal and political balances achieved through the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, and enforced with sustained effort.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY MICHAEL COMEAU

Can the Navy protect our interests and safeguard our maritime approaches while exercising eco-responsibility? It seems a tall order.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

A response to the ''Platform Procurement'' editorial from last edition.

(2012,
issue 4)

For DND, connectivity, interoperability and access to the right information at the right time are essential to conducting and supporting operations.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Just as the NSPS (National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy) brings new life to Canada’s marine industries, the Mari-Tech 2012 Conference in Ottawa lived up to its theme of “Re-Birth of the Marine Technical Community.”

(2012,
issue 3)
BY IAN PARKER

Regrettably, conventional wisdom will deliver different system solutions for each Navy or Coast Guard class or ship, dramatically increasing demand for future resources to support training, maintenance and supply requirements.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The future of Canadian warships to hopefully operate in multinational coalitions and sail closer to foreign shores.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY ANDREW KENDRICK

This article focuses the need to adopt a very different crewing philosophy than the current one.

(2012,
issue 2)

Battle Damage Control Systems

(2012,
issue 2)

Optimizing & Protecting Cargo Shipments

(2012,
issue 2)

Surface Based Sensors for Maritime Domain Awareness

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The first of 11 FREMM being built by DCNS.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY JANET THORSTEINSON

Canada’s new naval and coast guard shipbuilding program is the opportunity of a generation to create a dynamic, national high-technology industry sector.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Canada needs new search and rescue aircraft.

(2012,
issue 2)

All branches are attending the Norway Exercise Cold Response in the winter of 2012.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) program is already running into heavy weather.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

General (ret) Rick Hillier has been awarded the Order of Canada.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

DND's inability to spend it's budget in any given fiscal year is irresponsible.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Naval amphibious training exercise included 11 countries.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY MARKO BABIC

Positioning air and Maritime forces at the ''sharp end'' of the stick.

Interview: RAdm Henrik Kudsk
(2012,
issue 1)
BY JANE KOKAN

Canada and Denmark share the challenges of an Arctic AOR. FrontLine talks with RAdm Henrik Kudsk.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY TIM LYNCH

Working within NATO's ROE.

VAdm Paul Maddison
(2011,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The new Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy talks candidly about maritime and national security, ­discusses the challenges involved in preparing our sumbarines for operational readiness, increasing recruitment and securing the ocean commons for all peaceful nations.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

HMCS Charlottetown quickly responded to Op Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

Light, at the end of a long tunnel.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

International cooperation ensured the success of Operation Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY PETER PIGOTT

A look at the aviation component of Operation Unified Protector.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY ROBERT DAY

Examining the option of nuclear-powered submarines to enhance protection of Canadian littoral waters.

(2011,
issue 6)

Rheinmetall is set to create a state-of-the-art Training Centre for the Russian Army.

(2011,
issue 5)

By LGen (ret) Andrew Leslie General Leslie highlights the most compelling findings of the trends that took place within DND/CF over the last six years. by Dr. Douglas Bland Meaningful reform occurs only when it is driven personally by a resolute, ­tenacious defence minister. by Col (ret) Brian MacDonald The evolution of the 5Fs represents an attempt to find efficiencies by ­amalgamating similar activities.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

Many of us wish we could turn the clock back 30 years to a simpler, safer time, but we cannot avoid the reality of the modern world.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY KENNETH P. HANSEN

Considering alternative options for amphibious fleets.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY KENNETH P. HANSEN

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) sets lofty goals.

(2011,
issue 4)

Options for improvements in effectiveness for successful Chaff deployment.

(2011,
issue 4)

A strategic surveillance strategy needs to be in place to orchestrate daily domestic operations for years to come.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY MARKO BABIC

The bottom line is that counter-insurgency (COIN) is on its way out.

(2011,
issue 4)

An analysis of future trends in Somali piracy offers little in the way of hope that the situation will improve unless a new approach takes place.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS WITHINGTON

Canada’s involvement tasked HMCS Charlottetown to assist evacuations of Canadian nationals from Libya as the situation inside deteriorated.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY JIM CARRUTHERS

The most expensive part of the ship procurements needs to be seriously considered. What is Canada's Payload policy?

(2011,
issue 3)
BY PIERRE LEBLANC

Canada is only scratching the surface of future Cdn Ranger contributions in the North.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY MARKO BABIC

Defence of the Global Commons has become an emerging policy issue for NATO, DoD and DND strategists.

(2011,
issue 3)

Canada's respected contribution at U.S. Navy Pacific Headquarters.

Rear-Admiral Juan Guillermo Fierro Rocha
(2011,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

Mexican Navy deals with increasingly threats by transnational organized crime and subversive elements.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Most analysts would agree that the Atlantic has been the primary focus of Canada’s Navy – but that is changing.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The Conservative government has its well-deserved majority.

(2011,
issue 2)

Integration disparate subsystems to ensure mission success for Army, Navy, and Air Force application is critical.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY GORDAN E. VAN HOOK

Holistic energy management is proving ­successful for commercial fleets and can effectively cut costs for navies.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY THOMAS WITHINGTON

The Canadian and French navies conduct navy-to-navy staff talks to improve interoperability.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY LLOYD CAMPBELL

Understanding both the benefits and ­limitations of UAVs will help put the current debate in perspective.

LGen Walter Semianiw
(2011,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Protecting Canadians at home is ‘Job One’ for Canada Command. This organization is concerned with all aspects of national security – often working under the lead of Public Safety Canada to provide an important asset for emergency management.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Are the economics of the Canada First Defence Strategy still workable almost years later?

(2011,
issue 1)

Canada needs the capability to respond to all kinds of contingencies and everyday operations.

(2011,
issue 1)

Navy or Coast Guard? The question most often comes in the form of arming the Coast Guard, implying that relying on the Navy is somehow insufficient.

RAdm David Gardam
(2011,
issue 1)
BY TIM DUNNE

Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic speaks with Tim Dunne about how the NSPS will help Canada revive its formerly powerful shipbuilding industry. Admiral Gardam also talks about how the Navy can help monitor and guard against numerous threats initiated from the maritime domain.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence requirements never seem to lessen

(2011,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY

Canadian Forces Industry

(2010,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

War is much more than the deployment and sustainment of military forces.

(2010,
issue 6)
BY HUGH SEGAL

Our capacity to project, protect and engage is undermined and weakened without a strong Armed Forces.

(2010,
issue 6)

Canada will be without naval capability unless naval builds are accelerated.

(2010,
issue 6)
BY ANDREW WARDEN

Multi-national naval efforts provide humanitarian aid, deter terrorism.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

“We need to start cutting steel,” said General Natynczyk in September. Which shipyard will be chosen for the combat ships and which for non-combat ships?

(2010,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The Arctic presents a real opportunity for Canada to be a leader on the subject of Domain Awareness, using this to showcase Canadian thinking and technological expertise.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

We should be keeping an eye on events in the Pacific, the situation has changed dramatically in the last 60 years.

(2010,
issue 5)

The navy's pattern of resilience and innovation will serve it well as it faces its future challenges using science, technology, and planning.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY THOMAS WITHINGTON

Underwater mines pose a continuing risk to shipping around the world. Unmanned underwater vehicles can take the human out of the dangerous disposal equation.

(2010,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

MBDA HARDBUT testing; enhanced Leopard tanks arrive; SLAMRAAM programme may be terminated; UK Royal Navy will now operate only one of its Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers; US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) tests as well as other testing the Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multi-mission aircraft; Japan considers extra submarines; India still considering options for fighter aircraft; UK shift Royal Navy JSF purchases from F-35B STOVL to F-35C carrier version; Thailand to procure second batch of six Saab JAS 39 Gripen fighter aircraft.

(2010,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON

The Defence Ethics Programme may need to create a stronger presence as the military takes its lumps in the press.

(2010,
issue 4)

Over the past 30 years or so the Navy has gotten into the business of environmental protection. The amount of environmental legislation affecting naval operations, training and support activities has increased substantially in recent decades – as a result, the Navy has begun planning to replace MEPP equipment with the next generation of pol lution abatement technology.

(2010,
issue 4)

The NSPS may not be enough to improve the productivity and competitiveness of all Canadian shipyards. Can it address the need to meet the next generation of threats? Can it create a plan to invest in the R&D required to match new emerging technologies or the next generation of threats?

(2010,
issue 4)
BY ANDREW WARDEN

Will the Government engage the maritime industry in the JSS design process? Three very important factors for success will enable the Navy to get the right ships for the right price.

(2010,
issue 4)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

The Queen arrived in Halifax to inspect warships from around the world. More than 5,000 sailors were welcomed by cheerful maritime hospitality.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY ROBERT DAY

No other nation has followed this course of action, suggesting to their respective governments that unification is a flawed concept.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

The Royal Navy's Submarine Command Course was credited with reducing United Kingdom submarine losses in WWII.

(2010,
issue 3)

A multi-capable vessel, the French navy plans to use the Aquitaine for numerous missions: air-marine surveillance, escort, maritime traffic control, and maritime rescue.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY CHRISTOPHER BOBYN

Fresh from training with the Russian Navy in the Baltic, and subsequent coldwater trials en route to Canada, the Horizon Class destroyer arrived to waiting representatives from the Canadian Navy and the naval industry.

(2010,
issue 2)

Rheinmetall Canada, a proud supplier to the Canadian Forces, is an important member of the Rheinmetall Defence group. The company combines exceptional engineering with Canadian expertise in program delivery and life-cycle support.

(2010,
issue 2)

Operations on Afghanistan’s harsh mountainous terrain have proven to be a challenge for international forces’ tactical wheeled vehicles, too often limiting them to predictable routes on the country’s road networks.

(2010,
issue 2)

Naval combat ships are glamorous, but without their supply ships, they won’t get very far. However, in 2008, the CAD $2.1 billion competition to replace Canada’s 38 year old Protecteur Class supply vessels sank as many observers had correctly predicted.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

DND/CF, the RCMP, and other ‘action’ agencies can be depended upon to lead effectively, however, operational initiative is not always appreciated by other elements of ­government.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY

We, as a nation, can no longer accept administrative delays when it comes to enabling the Canadian Forces to provide critical security.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY JAMES CARELESS

Mexico’s military is embroiled in a civil war with the country’s drug cartels. It’s an battle with no apparent end in sight, and in which the very reason for bringing troops into the fray may well be their undoing.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER PIGOTT

Canada is pulling together in massive government response. Army, Navy, Air Force, the DART, CIDA, Foreign Affairs... all working feverishly to help Haitians in this hour of need.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

In recent years, Canada has struggled to procure replacements or even refits for its military fleet of ships. The shipping industry is optimistic that a National Shipbuilding Strategy may be in the cards.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

There has been a flurry of activity surrounding the Canadian government’s intention to invest over $40 billion into its Federal Fleets over the next 30 years.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Vehicle wear and crew fatigue pose both safety and combat ­performance concerns.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Is DND addressed rising fuel prices? What kind of savings can be realized by fuel hedging?

(2009,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

This most basic democratic right, surprisingly, is only partially available to members of the ­Canadian Forces whose service takes them away for several years.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY JAMES CARELESS

With some 1.4 million people actively serving in its armed forces, India has the third-largest military in the world.

(2009,
issue 5)

Rick Mercer at the Naval Operations School; Lockheed Martin; Rheinmetall; DCNS; Raytheon Canada; Minister MacKay at Nanook ’09, OSI Geospatial, Emrise Corporation, DCNS, Aimpoint

Commodore Hans Jung
(2009,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The stigma of mental health illnesses is a challenging barrier to health care. The key to effective treatment is that people come forward to discuss their concerns.

(2009,
issue 5)
BY DEWAR DONNITHORNE

Delivering the best capabilities to front line defence personnel must be the top priority for any capability procurement plan.

(2009,
issue 5)

Newfoundland and Labrador have been actively pursuing opportunities to design, develop and test leading-edge technologies in the UVS sector.

(2009,
issue 5)
BY BLAIR WATSON

The Great Lakes Deployment increases awareness of naval career opportunities, particularly in technical fields.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY LAURIE HAWN

MP from Edmonton Centre joins members of the 4th Canadian Ranger Patrol Group as they trek from Victoria, BC to Churchill, Manitoba.

(2009,
issue 4)

Smoothing the transition back home is a common concern for both the families and returning soldiers, sailors, and air men and women. These tried-and-true suggestions may help everyone relax and enjoy being back together again.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Construction at CFB Shearwater is under full swing. Rebuilding and modernizing after harsh downsizing, it promises to again become an important asset of the future.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

There is now a major debate underway among various military forces as to the appropriate caliber of rounds to be used in future conflicts.

(2009,
issue 4)

As the military continues its overseas operations, it will need more leaders to emerge within its ranks. That’s why it is important to learn from the great leaders.

(2009,
issue 3)

Gaining situational awareness in Canada’s northern territories and arctic archipelago.

(2009,
issue 3)

Assessing the Optimized Weapon System Management model Allowing DND/PWGSC to meet demands for procuring new air, land and sea fleets.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JERROD RILEY

The failing procurement situation for the Joint Support Ships (JSS) indicates serious repercussions for our sovereignty and economic well-being. The situation must be addressed quickly.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

With a mandate to protect the public, the environment, and security interests, the USCG has been testing its new Ocean Sentry planes in real life SAR.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY PATRICK LENNOX

Canada led a major multilateral coalition of warships, contributing to maritime security and stability in the Arabian Sea.

(2008,
issue 5)

Making a difference in the lives of Canadian Heroes who serve to make a difference for others.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY GARY H. RICE

To fulfill future security and humanitarian missions requiring long-range fleet deployments, the Navy will need capabilities of both replenishment ships and purpose built expeditionary amphibious ships.

(2008,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY

Assessing the problems and possible remedies to the dilemma of international attention and claims related to Canada’s Northern extremes. A “National Arctic Strategy” would quell further disruption.

(2008,
issue 4)

Creating effective maritime strategy.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Leadership needed for marine security.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Will Canada Command play a key role?

(2008,
issue 4)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

We must take the next critical step in ensuring the transparency and efficiency of large capital procurement contracts.

(2008,
issue 4)

The Government must recognize that there is a problem and be prepared to introduce real reforms.

(2008,
issue 3)

As stealth platforms, submarines are well suited to work either autonomously or with other maritime forces.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY JAMES BOUTILIER

Unprecedented levels of shipping, naval activity, ­disputes, and cooperation at sea.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY HUGUES CANUEL

Canadians need an active military ­presence in the North.

(2008,
issue 3)

Establish and maintain maritime stability and security.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY HUGUES CANUEL

Maritime assets are experiencing challenges of re-capitalizing the surface fleet.

(2008,
issue 3)

The security of the world’s oceans is vital to global prosperity.

(2008,
issue 3)

Building and strengthening Canadians’ appreciation for their navy.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY JERROD RILEY

Politicians continue to put ‘Party First.’ As a result, our ocean approaches will be without a credible naval presence for up to seven years.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS

The modern naval reservist has been training to become expert at important domestic security tasks.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY PATRICK LENNOX

A civilian joins HMCS Iroquois on the first leg of her mission to participate in the War on Drugs and the War on Terror.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Careful assessment of the post 9/11 global security environment has uncovered important niche requirements that the navy is perfectly suited to fill.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY JERROD RILEY

Interviews with Tom Digan (Lockheed) and Steven Yankowich (General Dynamics)

(2008,
issue 2)
BY JERROD RILEY

The Canadian government has approved an ambitious initiative, under the umbrella of the HCM and Frigate Life Extension (FELEX) projects. These frigates form the bulk of our surface combat capability and are in need of upgrades.

(2008,
issue 2)

Canada’s Navy defends the national interests of sovereignty & security.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY RICK HILLIER

The CDS speaks with conviction on what it means to protect & support our troops.

(2008,
issue 2)

Proposed job protection.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY COLIN KENNY

Counting the money differently isn’t going to put a dent in the performance of an underfunded organization.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY LAURIE HAWN

A visit to Afghanistan with the Minister of National Defence, Peter MacKay, and the Chief of the Defence Staff, General Rick Hillier, was another eye-opening experience as I toured Canada’s AOR... it has changed a bit over the last 12 months, and it is clear to me that progress is being made in that part of the world.

(2007,
issue 6)
BY HUGUES CANUEL

The ships and submarines of the Canadian Navy have maintained a remarkable tempo of operations at home and abroad. Important progress has been made in laying out the foundations of the recapitalization process required for the long term.

(2007,
issue 5)

Increased cross-border training between Canada and the U.S. is necessary for improving interoperability.

(2007,
issue 5)
BY LAURIE HAWN

Time to set sail with HMCS Algonquin as Canada faces the necessary task of rebuilding and revitalizing the Navy.

(2007,
issue 4)

Prevention, cooperation, & integration provide effective threat solutions.

(2007,
issue 4)

RAN looks to the future for long-term solutions.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY DRAGOS C. POPA

Further anaysis of the civil-military relationship.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Many are unaware of the full scope of what goes on in the Health Services - the underappreciated medical and dental services seems to be one of the CF's best kept secrets. The new Commander of the Health Services Group Explains her role and the wide variety of services under her command - from evaluating the health of potential recruiters to lifesaving front-line care of troops.

(2007,
issue 3)

Shearwater, ITAR, Joint Space Support, Health Services Group, Soldier On Paralympic Sport Summit.

(2007,
issue 3)

There is a clear need for a definitive defence industrial strategy.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

Address program requirements earlier.

(2007,
issue 2)

The Mistral-class LHD-LPD vessel.

(2007,
issue 2)

HMCS Ottawa's recent deployment to Southwest Asia, in support of the Campaign Against the Threat of Terrorism (CATT), was a resounding success - operating in every major body of water in theatre and covered over 30,000 nm of ocean - from the Persian (Arabian) Gulf to the Kenyan coast, including the Arabian Sea, the Gulf of Aden and the red sea.

(2007,
issue 2)

Canada played a major role in the transformation of NATO in 2006. The maritime component of the NATO Response Force, the Standing NRF Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1), played a key role while conducting actual operational missions throughout the year. Maintaining maritime situational awareness and the capability to influence the vast environment is a priority for NATO.

(2007,
issue 1)

“That’s Rick Mercer!” exclaimed Diane Grover as she handed over some wild pictures from HMCS Ottawa, “Canadian extraordinaire; Canada’s comedy ambassador; the CDS’ favourite Newf; and a genuinely caring and gracious man!” Delighting even the battle-weary, Rick Mercer brings his zany brand of humour to the hard working men and women of the Canadian Forces.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

The awarding of procurement contracts should be an economic bonanza for Canadian companies. Unfortunately, the way these contracts are being awarded seriously limits the industrial benefits that Canadian companies had hoped to reap.

(2007,
issue 1)

It is clear that the IRB policy is widely misunderstood. It has been portrayed as an impediment, an expense, and a tool for influencing military requirements through the imposition of “made in Canada” solutions.

(2006,
issue 6)

Warfare has changed over the past 30 years and will continue to change. While significant progress was made on C2 developments and Classified Network (CNet) capabilities at the strategic/operational level in the late 1990s and post Y2K, we are still far from having a fully integrated operational C2 Capability.

(2006,
issue 6)

The Canadian Navy has accepted the first of eight ORCA Class Patrol Craft Training vessels from Victoria Shipyards Company Ltd., replacing the seven 50-year-old Yard Auxiliary General (YAG) training vessels currently in use. The primary role of these new multi-purpose vessels will be to provide a platform to conduct basic and advanced navigation and seamanship training to Regular and Reserve Force naval personnel.

(2006,
issue 5)

HMCS Montréal’s 2006 Northern Deployment must be viewed within the context of renewed interest in Arctic sovereignty by the Conservative government. Neglect of Arctic sovereignty as a policy priority may have significant negative consequences and unresolved jurisdictional disputes in Canada’s North have arguably become more pressing for recent governments.

(2006,
issue 5)

Transforming naval forces to ensure we maintain a balanced fleet able to defend Canada for decades to come is necessarily an evolutionary process, involving as it does the fundamentals of the substantial initial investments required by naval systems and their long delivery times, offset by the unmatched longevity of major warships.

Gen Rick Hillier
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Fixing What's Broken: “It’s a great time to be in the CF!” says General Hillier after less than two years as CDS. He is in the enviable position of rebuilding an energized Canadian Forces…

(2006,
issue 4)

Recent attacks in Afghanistan have prompted a flurry of international reporting that suggests that stability in this war-ravaged country remains illusive. While this coverage is understandable, it does not show is the progress that is being made…

(2006,
issue 4)
BY JAMES COX

Just as government has been responsible for ‘downsizing’ the Canadian Forces, it should also be responsible for increasing it. Government’s role should not be limited to allocating money and then dumping the hard part onto the shoulders of the CF…

(2006,
issue 3)
BY KEN KRUKEWICH, BY BERNIE GROVER

We are in the midst of another great breakthrough in Modeling and Simulation – a technological ­revolution facilitated by the emergence of very high speed computers that process huge amounts of information at an ever decreasing cost...

(2006,
issue 3)
BY KELLY WILLIAMS

To efficiently manage this major Canadian Forces transformation, it has been broken down into a four-phase process.

Future Forces / International
(2006,
issue 2)
BY WARREN KING

An example of a major ongoing activity which lends itself to the support of the CF Transformation is the Joint Simulation and Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, Training and Support (JSMARTS) series of exercises.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY PAUL MANSON, BY HOWARD MARSH

The acquisition of equipment and related services for the Canadian Forces has become the hottest subject in town, for a simple reason: the situation, long deteriorating, has now reached the critical stage.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

Selection and Maintenance of the Aim.

(2005,
issue 6)

Many attempts have been made by people within the military, public service and private citizens to change the way explosives are governed in this country. Where does the resistance come from? Could it be that those who could rectify the situation are unaware of the problem?

(2005,
issue 6)
BY JOE VARNER

Al Qaeda has long had a fascination with maritime targets and has a history of going after these interests with only limited success.

(2005,
issue 6)

Last month, Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) led international surveillance-oriented trials off the coast of Nova Scotia. The 3-week long Maritime Sensor Integration Experiment (MARSIE) trial will directly contribute to Canada’s ability to conduct high-tech surveillance and secure its coastal approaches against potential threats and illegal activities.

(2005,
issue 5)

Effectively carrying out Search and Rescue operations is a significant asset that the Canadian Forces work diligently to maintain.

(2005,
issue 4)

Working closely with our American neighbours, there is a growing ­realization that our coastal borders should be dominating strategic defence interest.

VAdm Bruce MacLean
(2005,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The new emphasis on Security being recognized and supported by the Canadian Government has had a reinforcing effect on the Navy. After decades of downsizing, the Navy is building and diversifying to cover a wide range of security and policing roles on our coasts.

(2005,
issue 4)

Maximize operational effectiveness while minimizing total ownerships costs. A radically different approach to procurement is taking hold among many of the world’s military and security agencies.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY JOHN LEECH

The maritime environment is well known for its inherent dangers, quite apart from those always present in naval operations. Small wonder, then, that “those in peril on the sea” are right out there in the use and development of unmanned vehicles to help accomplish the mission.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

The most ambitious, Canadian-led, multinational, naval-air exercise of its kind since the mid-1990s Exercise Trident Fury is providing an excellent opportunity to assess the state of Canada’s Navy and interoperability with the U.S. Navy.

(2005,
issue 4)

In November, 2000 National Defence Headquarters released a concept paper entitled “Creating the CF of 2020.” That paper stated “Given the uncertain nature of the future security environment,” the integrated use of Modeling & Simulation (M&S) is a valuable tool “for forging the best, flexible posture for the future with the resources available... ''

(2005,
issue 4)
BY STAN JACOBSON

Recent issues of FrontLine have discussed the use of simulators in the field of maintenance training. The Canadian Navy was a world leader in the decision to migrate to PC-based maintenance training. This migration began as a result of decisions made in 1992 to support the evolving training requirements of the Canadian Patrol Frigate (CPF) project.

(2005,
issue 4)

In the Navy, shiphandling is a key element in the training and development of bridge officers and teams. It is a complex mix of knowledge, skills and judgment. There has been lively discussion about whether shiphandling is an art or a science, with a general consensus that it includes elements of both.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY INGAR MOEN

There is a growing emphasis to extract the maximum performance from existing shipboard sensors and weapons, as the threat evolves, technology advances and the cost to replace them become prohibitive.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS

In the context of national security, it has been made clear that the terrorist has changed the battlespace. This is particularly notable in the realm of Maritime Security.

(2005,
issue 4)
BY GARY H. RICE

Because Canadians no longer live in a “fire-proof house” perhaps now might be the right occasion to pay heed to the words of Liddell Hart: “A self contained and sea-based amphibious force is the best kind of fire extinguisher because of its flexibility, reliability, logistics simplicity and relative economy.”

(2005,
issue 4)
BY JERROD RILEY

''The little ship that could'' is enjoying a renaissance in the global naval community. Will corvettes brave the North Atlantic once again?

(2005,
issue 4)
BY DAVE BROWN

The Canadian Submarine Service of World War Two doesn’t get much attention or remembrance because few Canadians know there was one – and because its list of members who served (in British subs) adds up to only 27.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY MIKE GREENLEY

Readily available and cost effective new technologies make it possible to apply simulation to all phases of training - from development through to delivery, management and training support. These technologies can provide training in both the typical classroom setting, and ''on the go''.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY TERRY LISTON

In Defence Minister Bill Graham’s impend­ing defence review, he should consider two factors: the rapidly evolving technology; and the significant changes in the threat.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

On the world scene, emerging threats to security, coupled with the rapid pace of technological change, meant our procure­ment decisions were becoming more critical than ever. Increasingly, our military success depended on deployment speed, interoperability with allies, and leading edge equipment.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY RON KANE

The sustainability of defence sector firms is now just as much a condition of their economic importance as is their strategic importance to national security and defence.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY RALPH FISHER

With the shake up in leadership by Defence Minister, Bill Graham, and apparent mandate by the Chief of the Defence Staff, General Rick Hillier, to revitalize culture and structure, there is a growing warmth of expectation that we are entering a new age of naval forces for ­projection of power and humanity from the sea.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY KENNETH P. HANSEN

Daily revelations in the news seem to indicate that the impending Defence Review will result in the creation of a joint expeditionary capability. Such a fundamental shift in rationale should provoke changes in the force structure of the Canadian Navy.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY STAN JACOBSON

Training supports the ­”ultimate” activity, which is cost-effective, timely and accurate on-the-job performance. Individuals in the training pipeline (instructors, students, or support staff), are not performing operational tasks.

(2005,
issue 1)
BY STAN JACOBSON

...Force Multiplier or Achilles Heel?

(2005,
issue 1)
BY JAMES COX

Canada is not doing enough, fast enough.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JEAN JACQUES BLAIS

It's unfortunate that the subject of military spending is almost always precipitated by a tragic incident within our armed forces or their inability to respond when needed. This latest tragedy should be a wake up call that we need to seriously examine how we equip our military to represent our nation to the world.

German Bundeswehr
(2004,
issue 5)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Reduced post Cold War threat, budget reductions, and regional conflicts are driving factors behind the restructuring of the Bundeswehr (Military) from a large Mechanized force, structured to repel armoured attacks by Warsaw Pact forces, to lighter, rapidly deployable units suited for UN missions and Peace Support Ops.

(2004,
issue 5)

As the exclusive flight test agency of the Canadian Forces, the AETE conducts a wide variety of flight and ground testing involving every aircraft and helicopter type in the Canadian inventory. 

(2004,
issue 5)
BY SUNIL RAM

The Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) will see 5,000 more Regular Force positions and another 3,000 more Reserve positions created to ease the present manpower crisis in the military.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY JOSHUA KILBERG

A roundtable discussion on how NATO is addressing terrorism and WMD concerns.

MGen Andrew Leslie
(2004,
issue 4)
BY JAMES COX

Returning from his Kabul posting as Deputy Commander of ISAF, MGen Leslie remains convinced of the need for more soldiers and modernized equipment. In an exclusive FrontLine interview, he offers his insight of time spent in Kabul, and makes a surprising suggestion for increased efficiency. 

(2004,
issue 4)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

The recent efforts of the Canadian Navy in the Global War against Terrorism in the Arabian Sea.

(2004,
issue 4)
BY JERROD RILEY

“This story needed to be told” - Book review

(2004,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT DAY

Book Review

(2004,
issue 3)
BY GEORGE KEARNEY

The Government of Canada announces a National Security Policy (NSP) for Canada entitled Securing an Open Society: Canada’s National Security Policy.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY RICH GIMBLETT

It has been the fullest two years of Canadian naval activity since the end of the Korean War, and the lessons are legion.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY ROBERT DAY

Are We Ready for 4th generation Warfare?

(2004,
issue 3)
BY JOHN MORRISON

Social devastation occurred in the local economy as a result of massive job losses and social and individual psychological consequences occurred due to decisions to expand the company into ares that were arguable outside of its core competencies. It raises the question of what is leadership in the construct of making tough decisions such as those faced by this CEO.

Interview: General Ray Henault
(2004,
issue 2)
BY JOHN LEECH

The Canadian Forces responds to the changing security environment.

Maritime Security
(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

Traditionally, we have been a nation that “reacts” to crises, but Canada has a part to play in this international Security and Intelligence transformation.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The C-295 as a cost-effective means of securing borders and protecting resources. The basic design has been improved to make it a multi-role aircraft, such as for transport of freight, medevac and ­paratroops.

Protecting Canadian Sovereignty and Contributing to Global Stability
(2004,
issue 1)
BY STEPHEN HARPER

With unrealized potential as one of the world's leading nations, Canada requires a defence strategy that can better project our military forces globally, while simultaneously increasing our continental efforts to defend North America.

Admiral Ishikawa, Chairman of the Joint Staff Councils
(2004,
issue 1)
BY B.R. BROWN

Before his recent retirement as Canada’s Defence Attaché in Japan, Capt(N) B.R. Brown interviewed the Chairman of Japan’s Joint Staff Council, Admiral Ishikawa, about his plan of action.