CATEGORIES

(2018,
issue 3)

Does Project Resolve represent a catch-all solution for future procurement? Not likely; but it does highlight how innovative and less-restrictive processes can circumvent the inertia that has been crippling defence procurement.

(2018,
issue 3)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

After an intense 8-year period of modernization and recapitalization, the Russian government is set to cut its naval investment to 2,6 trillion rubles ($54B CAD).

(2018,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A critically honest and engaged discussion between government and industry on defence procurement issues was held recently at the Telfer School of Management as part of the new Complex Project Leadership Programs.

(2018,
issue 2)
BY JAMES FRYER
– a tangled web

How can the public understand why an interim buy of fighter jetss is suddenly necessary to ensure Canada’s security, when 13 former Air Force Commanders can’t either?

Top Defence Capability Leaders 2018
(2018,
issue 0)

Developing a complete ship design capability in Canada, primarily to support the Canadian Government’s National Shipbuilding Strategy. 

Canadian Surface Combatant
(2017,
issue 5)
BY FRONTLINE

CEO Bruce Samuelson recently spoke with FrontLine about the challenges of designing a warship and the unique skills and knowledge that Alion brings to this project.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A recent RCAF announcement may impact defence policy, defence procurement, SAR mission effectiveness. Who will answer the SAR community?

Canadian Surface Combatant
(2017,
issue 5)
BY STEVE ZUBER

Preparing for threats of next four decades will require next generation technologies and that includes the Infrared Search and Track system.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE
Oversight without Authority

The Procurement Ombudsman does not have the authority to stop a procurement, cancel a contract, or enforce its recommendations.

(2017,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Danish government has released a new defence agreement covering the next six years of defense expenditure and planning. It also defines the top two threats to focus on in terms of priorities and spending.

(2017,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
Treasure Chest or Pandora’s Box?

The federal government’s new Defence Policy is both a promising treasure chest and a potential Pandora’s Box of unintended consequences that would leave the Canadian Armed Forces struggling with more than one “capability gap.”

(2017,
issue 4)
BY ELINOR SLOAN

A persistent theme in the defence procurement debate is the lack of a single point of accountability. With shared decision-making, responsibility for achieving success lies “everywhere and nowhere”. Can we learn from our allies on possible steps forward?

(2017,
issue 3)
BY DAVID PERRY

The shifting of funds sends a negative signal as we await release of the Defence Policy Review (will it be pre-Summer or not until Fall?).

(2017,
issue 3)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
A bold call for recapitalization & modernization

A bold call for expediting platform replacement and modernization.

(2017,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence procurement is a dysfunctional system that includes an ever-growing continuum of approvals but has a non-accountability as its goal.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The first objective in the government’s strategy to improve defence procurement is “delivering the right equipment to the Canadian Armed Forces and the Canadian Coast Guard in a timely manner.”

From the Tower
(2017,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL
Is the air force tripping up on policy changes?

Does Canada face unmanageable simultaneous commitments to NORAD and NATO? The House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence (SCND) recently went In Camera to start drafting its long-awaited report on “Canada and the Defence of North America”, an issue the Members of Parliament have been studying for the better part of a year. 

(2017,
issue 2)

It’s safe to say the Canadian Patrol Frigate Program is the largest Defence project completed in Canada to date. We look at key factors that contributed to successful delivery of 12 Patrol Frigates for the RCN.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Asymmetrical warfare presents a need for Canada to develop its R&D expertise.

Lessons Learned
(2017,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

At the annual CDA conference, Interim leader Rona Ambrose shared her thoughts on the defence policy review and defence procurement.

(2017,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

We're told that procurement has to be complicated, and that teams of lawyers are required on all sides, but let's deconstruct that notion. Thinking outside the bureaucratic box would allow us to reset the parameters for a less cumbersome, faster, and ultimately "more fair" system.

(2017,
issue 1)
BY JAMES FRYER
Stroke of genius or sorry drama?

Defence capability gaps aren’t an issue in our country. So why should the federal government announce one now?

(2017,

The government of Canada may select the off-the-shelf design for the Royal Canadian Navy's new frigate fleet sometime next year. A dozen companies could respond to a Request for Proposals later this year.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

For a procurement to be legal, it must comply with both the Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) and the Government’s Contract Regulations (GCR).

(2016,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The year 2016 started out with great promise. First, we had a new and invigorated government...

(2016,
issue 6)

With a critical role in humanitarian efforts and foreign installations, heavy equipment fleets are put to the test.

(2016,
issue 6)
BY EUGENE GERDEN

After two decades of military cuts and reductions, Germany has decided that a rebound in defence spending is in order. 

(2016,
issue 6)
BY MURIELLE DELAPORTE
A Global View of the Naval Military Market

Industry and government representatives from around the world gathered to learn about new naval technologies and concepts. 

(2016,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Is it surprisingly ironic, or sadly inevitable, that the Liberals have begun to reach too far in a quest for control? On 27 October 2016, in a clarification to previous wording, the Government of Canada forbade any private companies interested in work on the CSC project (primes or subs) from any form of public announcement or promotion without prior consent from Irving Shipbuilding. This dangerous first step must be reversed – entirely.

(2016,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

DCNS will be working with Australia to ensure an evolving and integrated approach for the build and the sustainment of the submarine.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Obligations to shareholders and the ­markets are all very nice and, frankly, understandable. But what about ­obligations to taxpayers everywhere who ultimately foot the bills?

(2016,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The most important lesson the Trudeau government should take away from Brexit is take advice from informed sources.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY JAMES PARKER

Canada is not alone in suffering serious naval equipment design and procurement problems. The list of dilemmas that effect naval procurement around the world is long and varied. 

(2016,
issue 3)
BY DAVID PERRY

A mix of good news, pleasant surprises and disappointing news for Canada’s military. The budget actually contained several noteworthy defence related items.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY TOM RING, BY DAVID PERRY

Establishing a strong partnership between the Government and the Canadian Defence Industry should be an ongoing priority for the new Liberal Government given that Canada's defence sector will be an important part of its economic recovery.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY HOWARD MARSH

Does a Defence Review always have to precede a recession? Rather than raise expectations and dash them with subsequent economic reality, consider reversing the defence review process.

(2016,
issue 2)

Brazil’s military is currently struggling to sort out what they can continue to fund, what can be delayed, and what must simply be abandoned.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Does the name change to the National Shipbuilding Strategy signal a shift from the “longer timeframe for less capability and more cost” scenario the NSPS is being criticized for?

The United Kingdom’s Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

An assessment of Britain's National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 and how it impacts defence recapitalization.

2016 Defence White Paper
(2016,
issue 2)
BY BRIAN BERUBE

A look at key drivers to Australia's Security environment and the pace of military modernization.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Why does military procurement take up only 4 of the 269 pages in the federal budget for 2016?

(2016,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Average citizens should not have to dwell on how to deal angry jihadis. The Government of Canada should not depend on polls or approval ratings before making the necessary hard choices to ensure our peaceful lifestyle is protected against those who would obliterate it.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD CAYOUETTE
The Need for a Statement of Requirements

What are our future needs? Have new technologies and threats been considered? Read on for a personal commentary on the replacement program.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

A clear illustration of how the NSPS for CSC has gone overboard in complexity, lacks transparency, and involves a process that puts contenders’ IP at risk.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

These last few years have seen a flurry of activity. The bids have now been submitted – finally setting the stage for first delivery of new aircraft. FrontLine looks at the process and the contenders.

Defence Capability Leaders
(2016,
issue 0)

Canada’s West Coast shipbuilding and full-service ship repair Centre of Excellence.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Minister Sajjan’s credentials and influence within cabinet and caucus are going to be tested in the coming months.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY TIM DUNNE

The need to defend Canada always leads to a discussion of submarines. Now, climate change gives more credence to the need for nuclear-powered submarines.

(2015,
issue 6)

An in-depth update of the NSPS, particularly as it relates to Canada's new Surface Combatants program.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Based on Prime Minister Trudeau’s clear mandates to his new Cabinet ministers, the government is clearly ready to think outside the box when it comes to Defence Procurement.

(2015,
issue 6)
BY FRONTLINE

Where are they now?

Defence Procurement Process
(2015,
issue 5)
BY GEORGE MacDONALD

The latest DPS Report Card indicates the process has become more complex, and questions the process of restricting innovation options.

(2015,
issue 5)

Now with a new government, a serious review of Canada’s defence policy is urgently called for.

(2015,
issue 5)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

The 21st century has been called a maritime century, but Canadians don’t see themselves as a maritime nation. Many factors impact the existing and future maritime capability, and can often have unforeseen consequences.

(2015,
issue 4)
When the Best Price is Not Enough...

While many sports are officially won by points, the outcome is actually determined by quality and performance differences between the opponents. There is a direct correlation with defence procurement.

National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy
(2015,
issue 4)
Canadian Surface Combatant Project

With the release of the RFRE, the CSC procurement process has begun to move. FrontLine looks at Warship Designers that are potential contenders for the lucrative contract.

(2015,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Does quality and integrity in journalism matter? Do trade publications do enough to advocate for constructive change with informed commentary? Does the defence and security industry do enough to support the right effort?

(2015,
issue 3)
Status and Future Direction

The $35B National Ship Procurement Strategy (NSPS) was first announced in June 2010 following several failed high profile procurement projects – notably the Joint Support Ship (JSS) in 2008, and perceived challenges in delivering a successful Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project. Initiated with great optimism, FrontLine looks at its progression so far.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A look at how defence procurement activity will (not) progress through Fiscal Year 2015.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

With the next election set for 19 October, the government faces relentless Opposition in the House of Commons. To avoid making a decision that may cost it votes, the government is leaving the fighter jet replacement millstone in the custody of the National Fighter Procurement Secretariat (NFPS), which was set up in early 2012. However, further study is pointless and a decision is long overdue.

VAdm Mark Norman
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Getting many new ship builds underway through cooperation with key government departments, ­managing operations with reduced fleets, finding innovative ways to train enough new recruits, and the daunting task of overhauling navy culture, are all key priorities on the Admiral’s plate.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

The government has decided to offload all accountability to the private sector, why?

(2015,
issue 1)
BY DAVID PERRY

Aspects that focus on streamlining the process appear the least advanced.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence Procurement: it’s the Government’s duty to get things moving.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY CHRISTYN CIANFARANI

The proposed DAI is an important pillar of the DPS because procurement decisions should include a clear understanding of Canada’s complex and diverse defence industrial base.

(2014,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

The U.S. is simplifying how Canadian companies can export and re-export a broad range of aerospace- and defence-related hardware.

(2014,
issue 5)
BY TIM DUNNE

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy is aimed at to rejuvenating Canada's ­shipbuilding industry by reversing its headlong thrust into irrelevance.

(2014,
issue 4)
BY HUDSON ON THE HILL

Watching as Canada struggles to maintain a Naval fleet that is ­commensurate with its efforts to be influential in global affairs.

Frank Brunetta
(2014,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

The Ombudsman, Frank Brunetta, and his Deputy, Lorezo Ieraci, make sure the OPO staff is ready to spring into action when a potential defence supplier calls for assistance in the complex matters related to defence procurement.

(2014,
issue 4)

Is there a better option than single point accountability for high-value, high profile procurements?

(2014,
issue 4)
BY IAN PARKER

Canada's military focus has changed from strategic to tactical thinking.

Tom Ring, Patrick Finn, and Philip Jennings
(2014,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Procurement Reform: The Government of Canada has initiated the first stages transformative policy changes to guide procurement reforms.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Many have said it wouldn’t be done, some believed it couldn’t be done, but the federal government is actually working together to find the most workable combinations for defence procurement.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY JANET THORSTEINSON

Lessons from milestone moments will assist in the evolution of mutually reinforcing DPS objectives.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY TIM PAGE
– Next Steps

Recommendations for consideration may help to enhance DPS implementation success and level the playing field.

(2014,
issue 3)

A look at the costs and risks that drive pricing decisions for defence companies.

(2014,
issue 3)

Positioned to facilitate the objectives of the Defence Procurement Strategy, what can a DAI usefully do?

(2014,
issue 3)
BY KEN PENNIE

The new DPS does not directly address the levels of procurement experience in DND and PWGSC.

(2014,
issue 3)

Positioned to facilitate the objectives of the Defence Procurement Strategy, what can a DAI usefully do?

(2014,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Are criticisms of the FWSAR reset fair? Were years of work ''lost'' or somewhat irrelevant?

(2014,
issue 3)
BY JAMES PARKER

A look at options for replacing auxiliary oiler replenishment ships.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The state of the procurement business today means that more companies are competing for fewer projects in an increasingly complicated process. Richard Bray talks about the challenges faced in the Procurement arena.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Change is in the wind. Although no one knows exactly how this will play out, defence and aerospace industry leaders welcome the new initiatives, hoping they will bring positive change.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY ROBERT DAY

Ensuring sufficient experienced project management staff are in place is the first step in returning to efficiency.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY GEORGE MacDONALD

Watching DPS initiatives evolve to effectively and efficiently procure the equipment and services essential to the military.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY RON BUCK

How Defence Policy realities will affect the Canada First Defence Strategy Update.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

A look at performance measures, the major problems with the procurement process, and appropriate steps to fix it.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

A new Defence Procurement Strategy and an independent Defence Analytics Institute have been announced. Will they have a key role to play in fixing defence procurement?

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

A decade of painfully public, thoroughly documented delays and renegotiations has taken the procurement beyond an embarrassment to a political liability.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The scope of products and technology subject to the CGRs would be significantly changed through proposed changes.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

There’s no denying that the Department of National Defence is in financial disarray.

(2013,
issue 6)
BY DAN ROSS

Close personal experience has shown that we have a system of vague accountabilities and endless analysis by process gatekeepers with conflicting priorities that drive schedules off the chart to the right.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

How Canada builds new destroyers could determine success or failure of National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

In large weapon purchases, it's time to consider a better way to choose. The BAFO option is gaining support.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD, BY RICHARD BRAY

For maximum leverage in future acquisitions, Canada should find key opportunities in global supply chains.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Can a single-mission aircraft meet multiple government goals in the Far North?

(2013,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Troubling questions remain about quality control in the F-35 supply chain.

(2013,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

As frustration levels rise among those involved in defence procurement, FrontLine responds by publishing additional rounds of constructive commentaries in this and coming editions.

(2013,
issue 4)
BY IAN PARKER

For five years, the defence community has looked to the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) for direction. Today, in a greatly changed world, it may be time to change the CFDS as well.

(2013,
issue 4)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

With major acquisitions slated for the years ahead, some challenges to the assumptions underlying the Jenkins Report on Canadian defence requirements and industrial capability.

(2013,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Should Canada make defence decisions based on the military’s perceived requirements, or should key national interests dictate what the military needs?

(2013,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

A FWSAR fly-off would be a great idea if it tested either the search or the rescue capabilities (and preferably both). But it tests only speed and range?

(2013,
issue 3)
BY PATRICK DOWSETT

The Project Manager (2000-2005) recalls the original SOR process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY RON BUCK

A non-partisan, blue ribbon panel has the best chance of ­delivering positive outcomes in future defence procurements.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ROBBIN LAIRD

Airpower is ­central to 21st century security; but not by supporting aircraft with limited aviation tanking assets.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

An opportunity to “KIC-start” a long-overdue overhaul of problem-plagued defence ­procurement process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY TIM PAGE

The 2013 Budget commitment is a watershed moment for Canada’s defence sector.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

An opportunity to “KIC-start” a long-overdue overhaul of problem-plagued defence ­procurement process.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The procurement of FWSAR aircraft has waxed and waned for over a decade.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY IAN PARKER

Will Mahans’ advice to ''build a strong navy” be evident in the NSPS roll-out?

(2013,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The latest Budget places a new emphasis on trades education, meanwhile, the Controlled Goods Program flags job applicants based on national origins.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

The government has abdicated its role as procurement authority and allowed the shipyards to determine who is entitled to the billions of taxpayer’s money.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY JAMES PARKER

Would multi-purpose vessels be more cost-effective than an Icebreaker and Patrol Ships?

(2013,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

The program is steadily progressing. A look at the latest numbers. Are Canadian ­companies benefitting?

(2013,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Focus on the need for a robust system to challenge requirements specifications and the need to make defendable discretionary decisions to stay on track.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY JAMES FRYER

There are no bargains in a hostile sky. Alternative fighter jets could make Joint Strike Fighter look like a good deal.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Navy brass get that sinking feeling. A revised Canada First Defence Strategy could leave the Royal Canadian Navy with a smaller, less capable fleet.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Are you relieved that we are turning the clocks back to the pre-sole-sourcing days of the CF-18 replacement?

(2012,
issue 5)
BY PETER GARTENBURG

Getting the best possible “whole of government” outcomes from defence procurement.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Momentum is building for the creation of a Canadian Defence Industrial Strategy – government support in a global market is essential.

(2012,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Clear policies and strong strategies are the critical links that are repeatedly called for by so many in the defence communities.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

With this great summer weather, one might expect FrontLine’s editorial lineup to be on the light side. We have instead, some serious summer reading on many aspects of defence procurement.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

We’ve already established that Canada’s defence procurement process is painful, but why is that so?

(2012,
issue 3)
BY BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS

Choosing where and when to challenge the procuring entity can be a daunting task. (by Barbara McIssac)

(2012,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Just as the NSPS (National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy) brings new life to Canada’s marine industries, the Mari-Tech 2012 Conference in Ottawa lived up to its theme of “Re-Birth of the Marine Technical Community.”

(2012,
issue 3)
BY ANDREW KENDRICK

This article focuses the need to adopt a very different crewing philosophy than the current one.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence Procurement, SAR and Communication Control.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS

What are your options when a price mistake is made in a contract bid? (by Jack Hughes)

(2012,
issue 2)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) program is already running into heavy weather.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

DND's inability to spend it's budget in any given fiscal year is irresponsible.

(2011,
issue 6)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

New Years' Resolutions – Let's get the right expertise in the right position, at the right time.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Now that it has a majority, will the federal government relax a bit or tighten its grip on what they like to call “communication” but what is actually “control of information”?

Julian Fantino
(2011,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Former Police Commissioner has a steep learning curve ahead if he is to make any difference to Defence Procurement.

(2011,
issue 5)
BY KENNETH P. HANSEN

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) sets lofty goals.

(2011,
issue 4)

A strategic surveillance strategy needs to be in place to orchestrate daily domestic operations for years to come.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Will the new Associate Minister of Defence (Procurement), Julian Fantino, de-clutter the playing field?

(2011,
issue 4)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

A case for competing Canada’s fighter aircraft requirements.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

Numerous entities provide input to Defence Procurement, why? And do their roles really need to be a whole of government effort?

(2011,
issue 3)
BY JIM CARRUTHERS

The most expensive part of the ship procurements needs to be seriously considered. What is Canada's Payload policy?

(2011,
issue 3)
BY KEN POLE

A quick update on the recent U.S. announcement of changes.

RAdm David Gardam
(2011,
issue 1)
BY TIM DUNNE

Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic speaks with Tim Dunne about how the NSPS will help Canada revive its formerly powerful shipbuilding industry. Admiral Gardam also talks about how the Navy can help monitor and guard against numerous threats initiated from the maritime domain.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Defence requirements never seem to lessen

(2010,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

Controversy over Canada’s next-­generation fighter aircraft, is it valid?

(2010,
issue 4)

The NSPS may not be enough to improve the productivity and competitiveness of all Canadian shipyards. Can it address the need to meet the next generation of threats? Can it create a plan to invest in the R&D required to match new emerging technologies or the next generation of threats?

(2010,
issue 4)
BY ANDREW WARDEN

Will the Government engage the maritime industry in the JSS design process? Three very important factors for success will enable the Navy to get the right ships for the right price.

(2010,
issue 2)

Canada’s much delayed, $1.1 billion, Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) program.

(2010,
issue 2)

You have just been posted to NDHQ as a procurement officer... this should be a breeze.

(2010,
issue 1)

Defence procurements are as diverse as the equipment and services they obtain. The public environment in which it operates continuously changes over time.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY

We, as a nation, can no longer accept administrative delays when it comes to enabling the Canadian Forces to provide critical security.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

In recent years, Canada has struggled to procure replacements or even refits for its military fleet of ships. The shipping industry is optimistic that a National Shipbuilding Strategy may be in the cards.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

In our ongoing look at the challenges of IRBs, Ken Pole reports on the key changes being considered for an IRB policy update.

(2009,
issue 6)
BY KEN POLE

The Industrial Regional Benefits program, the cornerstone of Canadian military and security procurement, has been undergoing detailed scrutiny with a view to increasing transparency, fairness and efficiency.

(2009,
issue 5)
BY DEWAR DONNITHORNE

Delivering the best capabilities to front line defence personnel must be the top priority for any capability procurement plan.

(2009,
issue 5)

Cooperation: there’s a sea change in the works in how government consults with “Industry.” Risk: Govt wants to offload ''risk,'' requiring industry to build in a financial safety net which the govt doesn't like.

(2009,
issue 3)

A senior DND official and an industry executive face off about the defence procurement situation in Canada.

(2009,
issue 1)

What is with Canada’s helicopter programs? Why have they all run into problems? Is it the nature of the equipment, or is the procurement process causing things to run awry?

(2008,
issue 5)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

In FrontLine’s continuing focus on the defence procurement system, we bring you the thoughtful response from Janet Thorsteinson to an important question recently posed by Dan Ross, ADM(Mat): “Is too much risk being passed to vendors?”

(2008,
issue 4)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

We must take the next critical step in ensuring the transparency and efficiency of large capital procurement contracts.

(2008,
issue 4)

The Government must recognize that there is a problem and be prepared to introduce real reforms.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Canada’s Minister of National Defence, Peter MacKay, briefs readers on the Canada First Defence Strategy.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY LOUISE MERCIER-JOHNSON

Developing and maintaining an ­indigenous industrial capability would provide many benefits.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY BERNIE GROVER

Most major countries have recognized that defence industry policy is a vital ­component of their overall defence policy.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

I fell into the trap of believing that there was truly a desire to change the system.

(2008,
issue 1)

Responsibility should come with the authority to make decisions.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

FrontLine’s "Great Debate" on procurement looks at the situation from many angles... none of them very good.

(2007,
issue 6)
BY BERNIE GROVER

The general consensus maintains that Canada’s defence procurement system is not meeting the expectations of the any of the key stakeholders. And allegations of improprieties continue to plague the system.

(2007,
issue 5)

Is the defence procurement process as open and transparent as they claim?

(2007,
issue 2)
BY JOHN J.D. READ

There is a clear need for a definitive defence industrial strategy.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

The awarding of procurement contracts should be an economic bonanza for Canadian companies. Unfortunately, the way these contracts are being awarded seriously limits the industrial benefits that Canadian companies had hoped to reap.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY TIM PAGE

To effectively maximize taxpayer return on military procurements through strategic industrial benefits, Canada must first remove impediments from the IRB guidelines.

(2007,
issue 1)

AIAC proposes a series of measures aimed at maximizing Industrial Benefits of airlift procurements through flexibility in IRB commitments.

(2006,
issue 6)
BY DAN ROSS

The head of defence procurement in Canada talks about this heavily rules-based system and how as ADM(Mat) he protects the rights for fair and open competition while respecting international trade agreements.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Quebec’s aerospace industry will benefit very little economically, and the taxes paid by Canadians and Quebeckers will flow south.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY TIM PAGE

Claiming that Canada’s defence and security industries have grown and sustained themselves largely through their ability to earn international business, CADSI calls for a home grown industrial strategy to support its own defence and national security objectives.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY TIM PAGE

The Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries provides a checklist to evaluate the federal government’s ability to re-invest in military and security forces while achieving strategic long-term economic benefits for Canada...

(2006,
issue 3)
BY KEN KRUKEWICH, BY BERNIE GROVER

We are in the midst of another great breakthrough in Modeling and Simulation – a technological ­revolution facilitated by the emergence of very high speed computers that process huge amounts of information at an ever decreasing cost...

Future Forces / International
(2006,
issue 2)
BY WARREN KING

An example of a major ongoing activity which lends itself to the support of the CF Transformation is the Joint Simulation and Modeling for Acquisition, Requirements, Training and Support (JSMARTS) series of exercises.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY PAUL MANSON, BY HOWARD MARSH

The acquisition of equipment and related services for the Canadian Forces has become the hottest subject in town, for a simple reason: the situation, long deteriorating, has now reached the critical stage.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

Can transparency, efficiency and fairness co-exist in defence procurement?

(2006,
issue 1)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

Defence procurement is critical to defence capability.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY TIM PAGE

Best Value for Canada.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOHN LEECH

Selection and Maintenance of the Aim.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY SIR JACK DEVERELL
The need for authority and accountability

Expeditionary warfare against an asymmetric enemy makes profound demands on political and military structures, and brings with it high levels of risk, not least because the war is more likely to be one of choice than of necessity...

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The politicization of Canada’s Defence procurement process continued with the recent announcement of a $4.6 billion plan for 16 new aircraft to replace Canada’s fleet of old C-130 Hercules tactical transports just on the eve of the federal election. 

(2006,
issue 1)
What is it?

Canada’s armed forces are transforming. As outlined in the 2005 Defence Policy Statement, the transformation centres on encouraging innovation, promoting efficiency, and above all, on instigating a “fundamental change in military culture.” 

(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLAUDE BACHAND

Over the years, various procedures have been followed when purchasing military ­equipment, from long and costly procedures to replace the Sea King helicopters, to the purchase of 16 tactical aircraft at a cost of close to $5 billion.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY BERNARD COURTOIS

We are often the first to hear about challenges presented by procurement and, indeed, it is our role to speak on behalf of our members so that issues get solved.

SME Confidential Report
(2006,
issue 1)

This report is a compilation of conversations and communications with a Canadian consulting company.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOHN J.D. READ

Government procurement is a complex process, requiring careful planning, constant oversight, and highly sophisticated professional skills.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY ROBERT DAY
The Next Wave?

Canada has not possessed any capability for Combat Search and Rescue since the end of the Second World War when Canadian squadrons participated in the rescue of many downed allied airmen, however, this may have to change – and very soon. 

(2005,
issue 5)

The Canadian Coast Guard’s new status as a SOA in Fisheries and Oceans Canada means greater management and financial flexibility.

(2005,
issue 5)
BY KEN POLE

Its unique flying characteristics make the helicopter ideally suited to search and rescue missions worldwide.

(2005,
issue 4)

Maximize operational effectiveness while minimizing total ownerships costs. A radically different approach to procurement is taking hold among many of the world’s military and security agencies.

BGen Dwayne Lucas
(2005,
issue 3)
BY CHRIS MACLEAN

The revolutionary new way of contracting for the Air Force, Optimized Weapons System Support Management, puts more responsibility on industry, but they also gain in the global market by becoming “best of breed.”

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

The latest model is the C-130J, and it represents a nearly complete reinvention of the Hercules.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT

There is a growing demand for military transport aircraft. The world's Air Forces will take delivery of 922 new transports valued at US$53 billion. FrontLine reviews three aircrafts that could handle the CF requirements: Lockheed C-130J, Boeing C-17, and the Airbus A400M.

(2005,
issue 3)
BY MIKE GREENLEY

Readily available and cost effective new technologies make it possible to apply simulation to all phases of training - from development through to delivery, management and training support. These technologies can provide training in both the typical classroom setting, and ''on the go''.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY ALAN WILLIAMS

On the world scene, emerging threats to security, coupled with the rapid pace of technological change, meant our procure­ment decisions were becoming more critical than ever. Increasingly, our military success depended on deployment speed, interoperability with allies, and leading edge equipment.

(2005,
issue 2)
BY RON KANE

The sustainability of defence sector firms is now just as much a condition of their economic importance as is their strategic importance to national security and defence.

German Bundeswehr
(2004,
issue 5)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Reduced post Cold War threat, budget reductions, and regional conflicts are driving factors behind the restructuring of the Bundeswehr (Military) from a large Mechanized force, structured to repel armoured attacks by Warsaw Pact forces, to lighter, rapidly deployable units suited for UN missions and Peace Support Ops.

(2004,
issue 5)

This year's prestigious Canadian American Business Council Achievement Award goes to the ODEL - E-Z-EM team.

(2004,
issue 5)
BY PETER PIGOTT

With development costs for modern fighters rising, commonality and outsourcing to multiple allies has become the norm.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY PETER PIGOTT
The C-27J SPARTAN

Lockheed Martin and Alenia conceived an updated variant of the G222.

(2004,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM
The Media and the CF

Given the troubled times we live in, with a war with Iraq raging, nuclear threats from North Korea, and terrorists behind every corner, it is imperative that there be open dialogue between the military and the media in Canada.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

Budget 2004 has yet-again ignored DND’s desire for an integral Strategic Airlift capability.

Interview: General Ray Henault
(2004,
issue 2)
BY JOHN LEECH

The Canadian Forces responds to the changing security environment.

(2004,
issue 2)

Multinational flying packages which are becoming common in ­military operations today. The NFTC offers participating air forces a three-phase training programme for their future fighter pilots using state-of-art software and equipment.

(2004,
issue 2)
BY MARK ROMANOW

For a cost of C$80M, Arcturus SAR would provide both an improved east coast SAR capability and a footprint Canadian Military presence, demonstrating Arctic Sovereignty through increased NORPATs.